Great Lakes steelhead question

#32
Regardless of what they are, Id stil like to catch them one day. To me, the size of the rivers and fish screams switch rod to me. Roll cast indicator rigs like a boss, or swing an intruder on a tip. Id think a 7wt 11' spey should be the perfect rod for that
 

Charles Sullivan

ignoring Rob Allen and Generic
#36
They are landlocked steelhead. Just like landlocked Atlantics are still Atlantics these fish are stelhead. They are however landlocked. They behave like steelhead and look like steelhead, they don't have access to the Pacific though.

BTW- there are "rainbows" in the GL as well. They don't generally grow at the same rate as the steelhead. They certainly are different even if the genus and species is the same.

Landlocked steelhead.

Go Sox,
cds
 
#38
They're Rainbow Salmons

It actually amazes me how little most of you know about the very diverse fisheries over there, but yet know enough to make wild assumptions and argue with each other. It also amazes me that you've all chosen to hijack this guy's thread asking for info, and turn it into an argument of rainbows vs. steelhead
 

KerryS

Ignored Member
#39
They're Rainbow Salmons

It actually amazes me how little most of you know about the very diverse fisheries over there, but yet know enough to make wild assumptions and argue with each other. It also amazes me that you've all chosen to hijack this guy's thread asking for info, and turn it into an argument of rainbows vs. steelhead
It is not amazing. It is, however, fun.

FYI: The rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) is a species of salmonid native to tributaries of the Pacific Ocean in Asia and North America. The steelhead is a sea-run rainbow trout (anadromous) usually returning to freshwater to spawn after two to three years at sea; rainbow trout and steelhead trout are the same species. The fish are often called salmon trout.[1] Several other fish in the salmonid family are called trout; some are anadromous like salmon, whereas others are resident in freshwater only.[
 

Salmo_g

Well-Known Member
#40
Even if we do know what they are, what's with ". . . anadromidity . . .?"

Now that's fukin' dipshit make up your own words right there. I suppose he meant anadromy, if he knows what he's talking about.

Mr. Phister,

The only people making wild assumptions are those who don't know what they're talking about. Not that uncommon on internet forums actually.
 

Old Man

Just an Old Man
#41
The Eggs for the first Land locked Steelhead came from Washington. I think it was from the Skamania hatchery.So you can blame it all on Washington for giving away their fish.

Now I might be wrong but the eggs did come from Washington.
 

Alosa

Active Member
#45
It also amazes me that you've all chosen to hijack this guy's thread asking for info, and turn it into an argument of rainbows vs. steelhead
I knew I was running a risk of this debate when I asked for info about Great Lakes Steelhead. I get the sense that this deabate happens ALL the time. Since I started this thread I might as well add my two cents:

Great Lakes steelhead may have come from anadromous ancestors, and they may exhibit a migratory pattern the broadly resembles anadromy, but because they do not transition a saltwater/freshwater interface, and are therefore not subject to the physiological stressors of such a transition, they are adfluvial, not anadromous. Whether or not they qualify as 'steelhead' is equivocal in my books.

Now having said that, if WW's depiction is correct (wonderwoman vs. wonderblob) then perhaps my 6wt is underpowered afterall. Now I'm thinking about a 10 wt....
 

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