SBS William Servey's Drunken Dragon

zen leecher aka bill w

born to work, forced to fish
#1
Recipe:
tail: yellow dyed chinese pheasant philo feathers
body: medium size olive chenille
hackle: yellow dyed chinese pheasant rump
eyes: silver lined red beads mounted on a single piece of yellow RIO slickshooter
head: medium size olive chenille
hook: Size 6, 2x long. Mustad 9671

NOTE: My dyed pheasant rump is more green than yellow but it works the same for me.

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Step 1:
Tie eye post in at center of eye location.

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Step 2:

Tie in yellow dyed chinese pheasant philo (or fluff from lower side of rump feather) for tail

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Step 3:

Tie in chenille for thorax and triple wrap for bulky dragon body. Wrap the body and end it a tad before you reach the bead eyes. Do not cut off the chenille at this stage.

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Step 4:

Tie in yellow dyed chinese pheasant rump for legs.

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Step 5:

Wrap chenille forward to form head. Wrap chenille once around each eye post before figure 8'ing between eyes to finish head.

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Step 6:

Whipfinish and at this point you have the "Drunken Dragon".

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Big E

Active Member
#6
It's great that we can capture these local patterns while we still have people that know how to tie them. The Drunken Dragon was one of those patterns that we almost lost.

Thanks to you, we didn't.

Best,
Eric
 

zen leecher aka bill w

born to work, forced to fish
#7
It's great that we can capture these local patterns while we still have people that know how to tie them. The Drunken Dragon was one of those patterns that we almost lost.

Thanks to you, we didn't.

Best,
Eric
Last year after a post on this and words from OMJ I worked on this fly for 3 weeks trying to work the head and body out. It's an easy fly to tie once the directions are established. At one time in the early "aughts" William Servey showed me how to tie this fly. I forgot the details.
 

GAT

Dumbfounded
#9
Bill, I kind'a figured that. I use a lighter olive brown for most of my subsurface stillwater flies...
but I get the idea and that's what matters. It may also work with a black and olive variegated chenille I use quite often. I'll tie some in a number of colors. Thanks for posting the pattern.
 

Jeff Dodd

Active Member
#10
I think William lives here on Whidbey, in Coupeville mobile park.

I met him a few years back and he pulled a hand full of flies out of his pocket... Right out of the blue. Who carries flies in their pocket on the street!? Haha. William, that's who. He was very excited to talk about fly tying. One of the flies was this pattern. So simple but it catches fish like the Olive Willy!

Thank you Bill!
 
#11
Dragon fly nymphs, even more than stonefly nymphs, have a distinctive, robust body that tempts us tyers to imitate it. One good way is with shaggy yarn. Find a suitable color at a fabric store. Buy a skein, which will be a lifetime supply for you and ten of your tying friends. Wrap a hook with several layers, trying to match the tapered rear of the abdomen. Scissor trimming can help. Just the yarn makes a realistic body, but I like to add Swanandaze or other thick vinyl ribbing, covering 40-50% of the abdomen, evenly spaced. Black or dark olive plastic eyes are natural improvements. Knotting two or three pheasant tail fibers with an overhand knot makes a realistic leg. (Then make five more.) Pheasant tail or turkey make good wing cases.
 

bk paige

Wishin I was on the Sauk
#12
I don't remember the exact sequence how but he built up the sides parallel to the hook shank and then wrapped forward. This would make the fly flat and not fill up the hook gap. He had several flies that other people have stolen or call there own which is a shame as William was always very helpful and did demos several times at AATF.
 

FinLuver

Active Member
#13
I don't remember the exact sequence how but he built up the sides parallel to the hook shank and then wrapped forward. This would make the fly flat and not fill up the hook gap. He had several flies that other people have stolen or call there own which is a shame as William was always very helpful and did demos several times at AATF.
There are several ways to build the sides in a horizontal fashion. One can use foam or spun/clipped deer hair for floating dragons, used with sinking lines. Another option, is to lash stacked varied lengths of heavy mono on the sides to achieve the desired shaped underbody, for long leadered/floating line setups. Or, as I did in this fly, take yarn and tie it the shank length, on both sides; fold and tie back down the shank, stopping just short of initial tie-in point; fold and repeat, several times until you have the approximate size and shape you want; finish the shape of the underbody with tying thread, as you tie in rib and tail materials; then dub over the created underbody.
Dragon Fly Nymph_Slant View_4x6_052316-1.jpg
I watched James Brown (Homewaters Fly Shop) tie a similar underbody for his dragon nymphs.
 

flybill

Purveyor of fine hackle, wine & cigars!
#14
I don't remember the exact sequence how but he built up the sides parallel to the hook shank and then wrapped forward. This would make the fly flat and not fill up the hook gap. He had several flies that other people have stolen or call there own which is a shame as William was always very helpful and did demos several times at AATF.
I attended two of his demo's and tied up a few of these, great refresher as I couldn't recall the exact process of making this fly. I've always loved his other fly, the Olive Willy! Love tying that one, and a few variations that Ron showed me.. Haven't seen William in a long time, but loved his passion and patience in demoing how to tie the DD!!
 

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