NFR Help wanted

KerryS

Ignored Member
#6
hate to be a buzz kill

http://humboldtsentinel.com/2012/11/21/hsu-research-group-exposes-marijuana-grows/

sorry, but the way in which some of these SOBs are growing are amazing damaging to the immediate area and nearby watersheds. oh yeah, those plants are thirsty too, so whats the big deal if water gets dammed on a small mountain stream? Fertilizer drainage is a big issue too.

Its never easy
Uuuuuuuuu, in case you missed it, marijuana is legal here in Washington. The growing of it will likely become a commercial venture using greenhouses. What this thread is about is the State of Washington looking for experts to help craft the rules of engagement, if you will, for the production and distribution of said weed. All of which should go a long way towards the elimination of illegal grows on public land.
 

bennysbuddy

the sultan of swing
#7
I think the state should hire the Mexican cartels that have a proven record for procuring a profit & already have a marketing stratagy as well as a distrubution network in place. Why mess with success ?
 

ribka

Active Member
#8
Thanks for the laugh. Needed that after a long day at work


Uuuuuuuuu, in case you missed it, marijuana is legal here in Washington. The growing of it will likely become a commercial venture using greenhouses. What this thread is about is the State of Washington looking for experts to help craft the rules of engagement, if you will, for the production and distribution of said weed. All of which should go a long way towards the elimination of illegal grows on public land.
 

jersey

livin' the dream
#9
legal here in the land of fruits and nuts too...sorry, I mean CA

at least the home invasions and shootings have slowed down, but not the proliferation of illegal grows it does suck, wanted to show this as what can and does happen not against not for it, i could care less, until it crosses the line and it has

Phillip Marris actually bought a huge old pear farm in Mendocino with the hopes of a major, well financed farm. It was not well liked in the area and the idea fizzled for the time being

Think of that one coming into 7-11 for some late night hot dogs, a yoo hoo and a pack skunky's
 

Jim Wallace

Smells like low tide.
#10
Thanks for the link to the flyover, jersey. Look at all those red dots!

I read another article recently about the major degradation of watersheds going on in that area as a result of these farms. Many upper watersheds are having their water stolen by these farmers during the dry months of summer, when it is most needed to remain in the streams.

If the farmers were doing things right, they'd have built water storage tanks so that they could draw the water during the wet months to use during the dry ones. But of course they are all too paranoid to do that.

The run off from the fertilizer and pesticides is poisoning the creeks. Rat poison has killed off plenty of wildlife. I read that over 60 recent Fisher deaths by poisoning in the region can be attributed to illegal pot growers. This ain't no joke, folks. Clandestine farmers operating with no oversight is as bad a bummer for the ecosystem as any massive corporate industrial farm.

This is a good reason for local users here in WA to "buy local."
 

Alex MacDonald

that's His Lordship, to you.....
#12
Jersey, I'm not aware of any initiative that made pot legal in CA. Turn the law enforcement head in Mendo county, yeah, but legal, not to my knowledge. It's also interesting to note that nowhere in any country in the world, including the Netherlands, is pot actually "legal". At least officially. Unless somebody can correct me on that (if you can, please do?)
 
E

Evan Virnoche

Guest
#13
i lived in san diego for 5 years and in fact pot was legal with a card. Pay your 150 get your card and either proceed to the nearest dispensary or order it to your house
 

Flyborg

Active Member
#14
It's legal for medical purposes and decriminalized (not legalized) in general for California. Their medical laws are a lot more liberal than Washingtons. The problem Norcal has is that those farms and the guerrilla grow culture existed well before the medical boom. Throw in continued federal raids and the old guard in Norcal sees no reason to try and go legitimate to deal with a significant increase in demand.

Washington is an entirely different culture and with real legalization and regulation we'll face accountability for supply.

Alaska has been fully legal to grow for personal purposes and to possess for decades--a state law upheld by federal judicial review. They don't have the problems the Californians have because there's no need for an underground culture.
 

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