Sandlance?

#1
So I was at the beach yesterday and I it had been raining all day, and towards the end of the day I saw small splashes in the water. it was just out of the corner of my eye so I initially thought it was just harder rain. Then I saw that they were fish about 1 1/2" long or so kind of flopping around. Could these be sandlance? If so is it too early to fish top water patterns?
 

Preston

Active Member
#2
At this time of the year they might well be chum fry. Sandlance spawn from November through January and the young hatch in about four weeks. The larvae are very small and take several months to grow to post-larval size and begin to develop their adult coloration.
 

miyawaki

Active Member
#3
So I was at the beach yesterday and I it had been raining all day, and towards the end of the day I saw small splashes in the water. it was just out of the corner of my eye so I initially thought it was just harder rain. Then I saw that they were fish about 1 1/2" long or so kind of flopping around. Could these be sandlance? If so is it too early to fish top water patterns?
It's never too early nor is it ever too late to fish topwater.

Leland.
 
#4
So I was at the beach yesterday and I it had been raining all day, and towards the end of the day I saw small splashes in the water. it was just out of the corner of my eye so I initially thought it was just harder rain. Then I saw that they were fish about 1 1/2" long or so kind of flopping around. Could these be sandlance? If so is it too early to fish top water patterns?
I doubt that you saw sand lance this early.

Sand lance usually spawn in Feb. and emerge a few weeks afterwards. Sand lance are transparent until they are about 1 1/2 inches long and develop their silvery belly/olive-gray back coloration by the end of April. They grow about a 1/2 inch per month. Early May through mid Nov. they are readily available as a food source for sea-run cutthroat or coho. It is the best time to have success using top water sand lance patterns.

Roger
 

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