Chappie

FT

Active Member
#4
Jack,

Please don't take this the wrong way. Although this is a very excellently tied fly, it isn't tied as a spey fly. Spey flies have palmered hackle that is longer than the hook barb (at least the rearmost turn is and your fly only has a hackle collar. Spey flies also have tented wings, whether hackle tips, goose, or bronze mallard, yours doesn't have a tented wing. Spey flies also have wings that are never longer than the hook bend with the best spey fly tyers of old and currently having the wings end somewhere between the end of the body and the mid-point of the distance between the hook barb and bend. Your fly has the wing a long longer than the hook bend.

I know there are many who don't really know what a spey fly should look like or what its characteristics are. However, a spey fly really is a very distinct type of fly, just like a Wulff Dry Fly is a very distinct typ and an Elk Hair Caddis is another distinct type.

Like I said, this is an excellently tied fly. It just isn't a spey fly.
 
#5
Jack,

Please don't take this the wrong way. Although this is a very excellently tied fly, it isn't tied as a spey fly. Spey flies have palmered hackle that is longer than the hook barb (at least the rearmost turn is and your fly only has a hackle collar. Spey flies also have tented wings, whether hackle tips, goose, or bronze mallard, yours doesn't have a tented wing. Spey flies also have wings that are never longer than the hook bend with the best spey fly tyers of old and currently having the wings end somewhere between the end of the body and the mid-point of the distance between the hook barb and bend. Your fly has the wing a long longer than the hook bend.

I know there are many who don't really know what a spey fly should look like or what its characteristics are. However, a spey fly really is a very distinct type of fly, just like a Wulff Dry Fly is a very distinct typ and an Elk Hair Caddis is another distinct type.

Like I said, this is an excellently tied fly. It just isn't a spey fly.
FT
Never said it was a spey fly. Only said it was a good cutthroat fly and a good steelhead fly in the spey version.
The one I posted is my take on a Chappie.
Jack
 
#7
If I can this weekend, I plan to make a few in the more traditional cutthroat style on a mustad 3906 hook.
If I remember correctly, the spey version is a good summer run pattern.
Jack
 

Jim Wallace

Smells like low tide.
#9
Nice ties! I can't believe that I don't have any of those in my box.

For a similar pattern with green body, I like the Grizzly King.

However, I need to tie beach fishing and lake flies right now. The flies I'll need later for the coastal cutts in my local tidal creeks won't hit the top of my list for another couple of months.
 
#10
Nice ties! I can't believe that I don't have any of those in my box.

For a similar pattern with green body, I like the Grizzly King.

However, I need to tie beach fishing and lake flies right now. The flies I'll need later for the coastal cutts in my local tidal creeks won't hit the top of my list for another couple of months.
Jim,
Your'e talking my kind of flies. Grew up with the Grizzly King. Any fly tied on a Mustad 3906 or 3906B was a favorite of mine.

Jack
 

Attachments

#13
#15
Robert,
I have seen that version. No doubt it is a killer. I often wondered about bead head flies: is it the beads color, shine etc. which attracts the fish or is it just the weight of the bead that gets the fly down which makes them so effective???? Perhaps a combination.
Anyway, that is a nice one.
Jack
Jack,
Most of the upper Trinity is small, 300-500 CFS, increasing slightly to 900-1000 CFS at the North Fork. Consequently, a lot of SH rods with floating lines or Scandi's if using the 2H'ders. Bead gives it just enough to get in the zone.