Pyramid Lake Lahontan cutthroat making a comeback

#2

Thomas Williams

Habitual Line Stepper
#5
Now if they would just remove the dam that wiped them out in the first place you would see the Truckee erupt into more of a trophy fishery than it already is. Although I don't know what that would do to the wild brown and rainbow population. Good post. I was born and raised in Reno and it makes me miss home.
 

Salmo_g

Well-Known Member
#6
I read about the Pilot Peak discovery a few years back. Good to learn they are making a comeback.

I've long been puzzled why anglers cast from step ladders in that lake. I wonder if the Tribe prohibits boats or what.
 

Thomas Williams

Habitual Line Stepper
#7
We use ladders because the gradual slope outwards from the shore goes quite a ways before the drop off in most spots. If you were to wade out you wouldn't be able to cast to the drop off before the water was too high. Although there are spots that drop to 30ft almost immediately. You can use a boat but the wind is unpredictable and can be pretty fierce. That's why most fish from shore.

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#11
We use ladders because the gradual slope outwards from the shore goes quite a ways before the drop off in most spots. If you were to wade out you wouldn't be able to cast to the drop off before the water was too high. Although there are spots that drop to 30ft almost immediately. You can use a boat but the wind is unpredictable and can be pretty fierce. That's why most fish from shore.

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Spot on; the wind there can go from 0-50 in a second and not a place you'd want to be in a tube or a 'toon. With the ladders one also is elevated and can cast further. Some get very inventive; chairs, drink holders, etc. Most have a wider foot so as not to sink into the sand.
 

Kent Lufkin

Remember when you could remember everything?
#14
It is amazing story and even more amazing is that fish after nearly a century in a small stream keep the traits for longevity and fast growth when returned to their ancestral waters.
A century is probably just a fart in the breeze in an evolutionary sense so it seems likely that the Pilot Peak fish hadn't had nearly enough time to become disadapted from their historic Pyramid Lake conditions. What's more amazing is that the Utah guy back in 1900 had the foresight to put some of the original fish in the Pilot Peak stream. Wonder if we'll ever look back the same way at some of the bonehead things today's bucket biologists do.

K
 

JE

Active Member
#15
It is amazing story and even more amazing is that fish after nearly a century in a small stream keep the traits for longevity and fast growth when returned to their ancestral waters.

Curt
Amen to that Curt. Maybe a little hope lies with those little native rainbows in our upper drainages.
 

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