Wild Reverence Sessions Webisode

#2
Hi Gang,

I just cut my first webisode in conjunction with my film "Wild Reverence". Its called "River of Hope" starring John Larison down on the Oregon Coast. I hope get a few more of these shorts rolling as i begin editing the film.


shane
Excellent video and your commentary was right on the "money" so far as impacts of roads and logging on the stream environment.

I was a forest hydrologist in Washington in the early 1970's through the early 1990's and fought many battles to help change the thinking of "getting out the cut" mentality. Road densities and culverts were major issues plus streamside buffer strips. Making changes can sometimes be a slow process especially when dealing with decision makers higher up in an organization or company.

I was appalled by what the streamside buffer strip looked liked in the video. It appeared that only alder trees were left which would not provide little future large woody debris necessary for a healthy fish bearing stream. Plus tall old growth conifers would provide much more shading than alder. It looked like the practices that were used 20 to 30 years. State agencies and Federal land ovners should not have allowed such an inadequate streamside buffer strip. I guess that the land owners can get away with it if the logging operation is in a remote area and out the publics view.

Hopefully this video and other video which you make will help bring the issue to the publics attention. Well done and keep it up!

Roger
 
#4
Shane:

I forgot to mention in my previous post that the video portion showing the road culvert and downslope impacts was a very powerful visual image showing the effects to the stream fisheries. Your video shows in a creditable, believable manner the points which you are trying to convey in a professional way. You have some real talent in that regard. Keep it up!

Roger
 
#6
Have to agree with Roger--the imagery was great in the video. Nice job of showing the logging impacts as he told his story. I think that that helped bring it home a bit.

And him hooking into that hen midway through was definitely a bonus!

Jason
 
#8
Thanks all!!! The moment I stepped foot out there I was blown away by the careless logging practices. And knew i needed to get this piece out there before the feature film is done. If you are a private land owner in Oregon you can pick and choose where your stream buffers are. So if your required 40 ft. and there is some good timber you can log it right up to the river then make an 80 ft buffer to supplement it with alders or other small wood. Thanks for all your support!!!
 
#9
Excellent video and your commentary was right on the "money" so far as impacts of roads and logging on the stream environment.

I was a forest hydrologist in Washington in the early 1970's through the early 1990's and fought many battles to help change the thinking of "getting out the cut" mentality. Road densities and culverts were major issues plus streamside buffer strips. Making changes can sometimes be a slow process especially when dealing with decision makers higher up in an organization or company.

I was appalled by what the streamside buffer strip looked liked in the video. It appeared that only alder trees were left which would not provide little future large woody debris necessary for a healthy fish bearing stream. Plus tall old growth conifers would provide much more shading than alder. It looked like the practices that were used 20 to 30 years. State agencies and Federal land ovners should not have allowed such an inadequate streamside buffer strip. I guess that the land owners can get away with it if the logging operation is in a remote area and out the publics view.

Hopefully this video and other video which you make will help bring the issue to the publics attention. Well done and keep it up!

Roger
Thanks a lot Roger!! Kudos to your years of hard work! I really hope people can see these films i am making and begin to act and change toward a more sustainable future for us, the forests, and the fish. The poor fish have taken such a beating. And all this carefree habitat destruction is not helping a bit. I really appreciate your comments.
 
#12
And knew i needed to get this piece out there before the feature film is done.
Amen!

There is the "old" saying that pictures are worth a thousand words. Your video fits that perfectly! Getting large viewage by the public would be great. The big question is how to open the "door". Maybe a TV newscast could do a 2 to 3 minute clip of portions of important commentary and video.

I know that the Sierra Club has been active in California and Washington concerning the issues in your video. I would think that they would be extremely interested in the video and feature film when it is completed. Maybe they could help you open some "doors". I'll bet that public supported TV stations would also be interested in the feature film.

Looking forward to seeing the end product and hope that you are successful getting large viewage of it. Hope that the "foot work" is a journey down a short trail rather than a long one. Maybe some members on this forum would be able to help you get access to the right people to make it happen.

Quality work!

Roger
 
#13
This trailer reminded me of a movie we saw at our river stewards retreat last august, called "PassCreek", it was made in the sixties and was way ahead of its time. less than ten minutes long, here is the link:


There is no sound at the begining