A rookies log.

Status
Not open for further replies.

Luke77

I hope she likes whitefish
Our dear sarcastic friend Jesse is making a comparison between Salmo_G, one of the most knowledgeable members on this board, to you, Danielocean, a knowledge thirsty, shirt-tugging-as-if-you-were-a-child-at-the-candy-store-begging-for-everything-you-see...newbie.
 
We were all newbies at one point, including Jesse. And, you might find comfort in knowing that many on this forum are gear whores just like you. They just don't want you to make the same mistakes that others did, in spending all kinds of dough on shit you don't need. The best way to figure that out is by being on the water and troubleshooting the problems you're faced with and solving for them. However, buying a bunch of shit will not necessarily put you in the game anymore than you would be with one rod and learning to present the fly correctly with that rod. That's how I learned and continue to learn.

I continue to discover situations where I may not be set up just how I want, so I tweak my set up or research what I need to purchase in order to give me what I may need. It would really suck to discover a year from now that you blew a couple thousand dollars on crap you just don't need, use or feel is right for solving the situations you will inevitably be faced with. Take it easy, seek out where you want to fish, learn how to present your fly properly in that water and it will happen.
 

JesseC

Active Member
We were all newbies at one point, including Jesse. And, you might find comfort in knowing that many on this forum are gear whores just like you. They just don't want you to make the same mistakes that others did, in spending all kinds of dough on shit you don't need. The best way to figure that out is by being on the water and troubleshooting the problems you're faced with and solving for them. However, buying a bunch of shit will not necessarily put you in the game anymore than you would be with one rod and learning to present the fly correctly with that rod. That's how I learned and continue to learn.

In fact, the more shit you buy (rods, lines, flies, sink tips) the less liklihood you'll have of actually productively learning. You need to remove as many variables that you can from the equation.

In reality - one rod, one sink tip, two flies... that's all you need.

You should stick to fishing water that you know is productive too. There's no reason to be jumping up and down the river exploring like a mad man. Fish the same couple of runs and learn how the flows and timing affect your chances of success at hooking up with a fish.

Once you have some initial success and the confidence that comes with it, you can join the rest of us in whoring out on rods and random gear and fruitlessly chasing steelhead hundreds of miles away from home.

A guide is good, but finding a kind friend who knows their shit is much much much better.
 

golfman44

5-Time Puget Sound Steelhead Guide of the Year
Daniel you got off easy. Jesse tore me a new one when I first started posting here. I felt like I was one of those girls on the Maury show whos ex boyfriend is dancing around infront of her because he is not the father of her baby.




At the end of it tho, he did give me tips about the sno forks and it helped contribute to a few successful trout fishing trips so it was worth it.
 

JesseC

Active Member
Daniel you got off easy. Jesse tore me a new one when I first started posting here. I felt like I was one of those girls on the Maury show whos ex boyfriend is dancing around infront of her because he is not the father of her baby.




At the end of it tho, he did give me tips about the sno forks and it helped contribute to a few successful trout fishing trips so it was worth it.

You're thinking of another guy - I never helped a damn person on this forum!!! Don't be accusing me of that type of shit. I've got a reputation on here to protect! ;)
 
In fact, the more shit you buy (rods, lines, flies, sink tips) the less liklihood you'll have of actually productively learning. You need to remove as many variables that you can from the equation.

In reality - one rod, one sink tip, two flies... that's all you need.

You should stick to fishing water that you know is productive too. There's no reason to be jumping up and down the river exploring like a mad man. Fish the same couple of runs and learn how the flows and timing affect your chances of success at hooking up with a fish.

Once you have some initial success and the confidence that comes with it, you can join the rest of us in whoring out on rods and random gear and fruitlessly chasing steelhead hundreds of miles away from home.

A guide is good, but finding a kind friend who knows their shit is much much much better.


Talked to Joe Ewing at Pacific Fly fishers and I think next week I am going to book a guided trip with him.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

Latest posts