Basic things to check on an outboard?

Dipnet

The wanted posters say Tim Hartman
#16
Nick, as others have said, IMHO, it might be a fuel issue.

I would guess that Cheez/Jay let this boat sit for a long time with only a partially-filled tank and that he didn't pour fuel conditioner into the tank.

The worst thing to do is to have a not full gas tank. That just allows a lot of condensation inside the tank and the ethanol gas exacerbates the water/fuel problem.

Also, if it's sat for long, the ethanol can even deteriorate fuel lines and and other components and this crud can clog the lines.

You might wanna read this: http://www.iboats.com/basics/ethanol_fuels.html

I'd get rid of the old fuel, clean the fuel system as best you can and then enjoy your new vessel!
 

Alex MacDonald

that's His Lordship, to you.....
#17
sounds like gas to me, too. The two best days in a boat owner's life is (1) when he buys it, and (2) when he sells it! One thing I do is pull the fuel line off as I motor up to the dock, and let the gas in the bowl go through the engine as it idles. Once the motor shuts off, I know there's nothing in the carb to gum up the works, and no ethanol sitting around to screw up the gaskets in the carb.
 

Chris Bellows

Your Preferred WFF Poster
#18
One thing I do is pull the fuel line off as I motor up to the dock, and let the gas in the bowl go through the engine as it idles. Once the motor shuts off, I know there's nothing in the carb to gum up the works, and no ethanol sitting around to screw up the gaskets in the carb.
good advice, and if it will sit awhile make sure to fully drain the carbs. i know on my honda there is still gas in the carbs even after running them dry. on the hondas it is easy to fully drain each individual carb.

i will concur also on fuel treatment... my boat runs better after 100 hours with treated fuel than when i got it used after sitting awhile and having the carbs sonic cleaned.
 

Benjy

Active Member
#19
While we're on the topic- don't run that gas that's been sitting in a can in your garage for the last 8 months. Put that stuff in your truck or lawn mower and use fresh gas in the outboard. I recommend an in line fuel/water separator, $30 for piece of mind.
 
#20
Today I took a new to me 15' Smokercraft and 25 HP Merc 4 stroke that I am acquiring from a fellow forum member for our maiden voyage. A buddy from work went with me.

We put in at Manchester, and putterer around a bit just to get a feel for her. The motor starts first pull and idled fine, however after a few minutes of running it started to stall. It acted like a car with a bad fuel filter....when I throttled it it would just sort of bog down, lag, and try to stall. If I backed off the throttle it would settle down.

Anyway, ended up taking it to a shop as I know nothing of Outboards. Shop says most likely something in the carb from sitting for a while, and hopefully that's all it is, but it occurs to me that if I'm to be a boat owner now it would be a good idea if I learned a little bit. I'm sure this will happen again in the future and it would be nice to know some basic things to look for.


So, what would you have checked in this situation? What are some basic things to check whenever an outboard acts up? What about any specific tools that would be happy to keep in the boat just in case?

I am good with the mechanic checking this out for me, would just like to become more self sufficient in the future
 

Jim Wallace

Smells like low tide.
#22
I hope my 9.9 hp runs OK. Haven't even had the power boat out this year. I ran the motor dry last time I used it, but failed to drain the carb bowl. I did change the motor oil, though. I do have fuel stabilizer in my gas. I'll find out soon!

I should probably change the gear oil, too.