"Rediscovering" Old Patterns

GAT

Dumbfounded
#79
This just in from the NSA. All the trout have met for their annual conference to decide which fly patterns they will no longer attempt to eat. It doesn't look good for the Quill Gordon.
 
#80
I got a small coho from a lake on a Mountain Thunder last weekend.

A bit after that I got a decent cutthroat on a really natural PT-body, India hen hackled soft hackle.
 

kelvin

Active Member
#82
What is the history of the house and lot?

TC
It was President Dwight D. Eisenhower favorite fy that's all i know

that and it works


The H and L Variant is an old-timer among rough-water dry flies. It has wings and a tail of calf tail. The method most tiers use for the body is to partially strip a peacock quill, when wrapped, the bare quill forms the rear half of the body and the fiber-covered quill the front half. This allows you to create both the front and rear body sections in one step, and a thin layer of head cement over the thread-wrapped shank will help toughen the body. I prefer to tie in both halves of the body separately as shown - with a bit of head cement on the bare quill, this body is tough indeed. The H and L Variant is sometimes tied with over-size hackle, in traditional variant fashion, and it is sometimes tied with hackles of conventional size; I prefer the conventional. The H and L Variant is also referred to as the House and Lot.
 
#83
It was President Dwight D. Eisenhower favorite fy that's all i know

that and it works


The H and L Variant is an old-timer among rough-water dry flies. It has wings and a tail of calf tail. The method most tiers use for the body is to partially strip a peacock quill, when wrapped, the bare quill forms the rear half of the body and the fiber-covered quill the front half. This allows you to create both the front and rear body sections in one step, and a thin layer of head cement over the thread-wrapped shank will help toughen the body. I prefer to tie in both halves of the body separately as shown - with a bit of head cement on the bare quill, this body is tough indeed. The H and L Variant is sometimes tied with over-size hackle, in traditional variant fashion, and it is sometimes tied with hackles of conventional size; I prefer the conventional. The H and L Variant is also referred to as the House and Lot.
I thought it was Jimmy Carters' favorite. Isn't he also a flyfisher?

A lot of the folks that sat in the Oval office were fly fishers.


Never fished the pattern myself. Never found need of it. I prefer
other attractor flies, i.e. Humpies in olive, yellow, orange or red.
 

Tim Cottage

Formerly tbc1415
#84
It was President Dwight D. Eisenhower favorite fy that's all i know

that and it works


The H and L Variant is an old-timer among rough-water dry flies. It has wings and a tail of calf tail. The method most tiers use for the body is to partially strip a peacock quill, when wrapped, the bare quill forms the rear half of the body and the fiber-covered quill the front half. This allows you to create both the front and rear body sections in one step, and a thin layer of head cement over the thread-wrapped shank will help toughen the body. I prefer to tie in both halves of the body separately as shown - with a bit of head cement on the bare quill, this body is tough indeed. The H and L Variant is sometimes tied with over-size hackle, in traditional variant fashion, and it is sometimes tied with hackles of conventional size; I prefer the conventional. The H and L Variant is also referred to as the House and Lot.
Thanks for that. I am assuming that by traditional variant you are referring to the Neversink Skaters, Hewitt flies and other high riding extra long hackled flies.

TC
 

kelvin

Active Member
#85
Thanks for that. I am assuming that by traditional variant you are referring to the Neversink Skaters, Hewitt flies and other high riding extra long hackled flies.

TC
I have no Idea what you are talking about I down loaded info from the internet
ALLS I KNOW IS....I tie em ,they are and older pattern, and they work


great post thanks for stating it
 

Krusty

Active Member
#87
Fly patterns don't stop producing, they just become passe. Flyfishers are just as fickle as the young lasses that, for a short while until the fad passed, hung our beloved hackles in their hair.

Sometimes, when fish are hitting, I just start randomly switching flies just to see what they DON'T hit. Often they'll take almost anything anything even vaguely like the first one....and by 'vaguely' I don't mean a fly pattern variation, but maybe just the same general color and size.

We buy magazines that feed our fantasy of thinking we know what we're doing....from reading them you'd think fish are evolving at a very rapid pace.
 
#88
Fly patterns don't stop producing, they just become passe. Flyfishers are just as fickle as the young lasses that, for a short while until the fad passed, hung our beloved hackles in their hair.

Sometimes, when fish are hitting, I just start randomly switching flies just to see what they DON'T hit. Often they'll take almost anything anything even vaguely like the first one....and by 'vaguely' I don't mean a fly pattern variation, but maybe just the same general color and size.

We buy magazines that feed our fantasy of thinking we know what we're doing....from reading them you'd think fish are evolving at a very rapid pace.
Yep. They're not evolving except at their same old slow pace. In the course of fly fishing history, this is basically not at all, not even a "geologic blink."
 

weiliwen

Active Member
#90
I like to go into my collection of old "Salmon Trout Steelheader" to find classic flies. I have all the issues '67-'80 and in each one was an article about a popular fly, many by Mark Bachmann, who now owns The Fly Fishing Shop in Welches, Oregon.