Your favorite sculpin pattern

#16
Or a plug for that matter. That's what I like about the fish sculls. Drop one in the water, it swims down to the bottom then you just twitch it up fast. Works on those browns in Pass and the big Bows. in the Yakima canyon.
 

GAT

Dumbfounded
#17
Or a plug for that matter. That's what I like about the fish sculls. Drop one in the water, it swims down to the bottom then you just twitch it up fast. Works on those browns in Pass and the big Bows. in the Yakima canyon.
That is a technique that will most likely represent the movement of the real critter. The fly needs to be presented close to the bottom than rapidly moved around. And I mean rapidly. The sculpins I watched moved as quickly as The Flash ... but for only short distances.
 
#18
Fast or not, fish eat alot of sculpin. I think most of the ones they get are disoriented or sick/wounded. I love observing nature, and one memorable moment was watching 5-6# lahontans beach themselves chasing sculpins. I think the waves were dislodging the sculpins from the bottom, leaving them disoriented and confused. Surprisingly, most of the time the cutts got their meal. I'm surprised because it seems like lahontans have poor aim, often swiping at prey several times before connecting.
 
#19
There is a difference between a sculpin moving around an aquarium and one in the river. Sculpins move in short bursts their huge pec fins are great at getting up to speed but they can't sustain it very long especially upstream. When a hunting trout flushes one out of the rocks they can catch it. No problem. When sculpin start scrambling around popping up out of the rocks to feed they enter the food chain and get whacked. If they get reckless and stray up a couple feet say good night. Trout that have developed a taste for sculpins rarely say no when opportunity arises.
 

McNasty

Canyon Lurker
#20
i can't think of a species of trout/char around where i live that hasn't coughed up a sculpin or had one in its mouth when caught. i like your observations Gene but i think Sean nailed it. hell ive even found big sculpin choked to death on smaller sculpin still in their mouth.
 
#22
Guess I'm just hung up on old stuff but the rolled muddler has been such a good producer that I continue to use it. The only modification I make is to sometimes add a bead head. It has produced many SRCs, coho, rainbows, browns, even steelhead. However, Paul's patterns look pretty sexy!
Jim,
I am also a fan of the Rolled Muddler and I particularly enjoy tying it as close to the original pattern as possible i.e. the arrow shaped head and the little bit of red thread (gills) showing behind the head.
An all time great pattern.
Keep in mind that Tom Murray, the fly's originator, intended the fly to be an imitation of saltwater beach sticklebacks and not sculpin. But, who is to say what a Sea-run sees when it nails one!
Jack
 

Sawyer

Active Member
#23
If they get reckless and stray up a couple feet say good night. Trout that have developed a taste for sculpins rarely say no when opportunity arises.
So what I'm taking from this is, you don't need a sculpin that will sink to the bottom. And a Muddler minnow on a sinking line would probably do the trick in less than 6 feet of water?
The other thing is, from what I've read is Chester Allan catches SRC in Muddlers regularly
 

Philster

Active Member
#25
It's hard to beat a properly sized unweighted wooly bugger, with a split just up the tippet. Woolies are some of the best sculpin and craw patterns. Plus they cast so much easier than the realistic patterns. Cast quartering upstream with a floating line and a long leader to get near the bottom. Manage your line and let the fly drift with periodic short quick strips. The shot, as much as you need to get down, up the tippet (2 or 3 inches) gives it great action. I never weighted my buggers. put the weight on the leader.
 

Latest posts