Walking Trails with a Rod in Hand

#16
Speaking of which, and slightly off-topic I know – but how can you tell the difference between the reissued "classic" or a vintage LL?
 

10incher

Active Member
#17
A lot of talk about rods broken due to trail stomping. JM2C but I use my graphite rods for bigger streams, still water, etc. where I'll need extra distance and there are usually decent trails. For small stream bushwhacking I take my fiberglass rods. Much less fragile and I do like the way they fish for small water. I've had many accidents like tripping over blackberry bushes or small tumbles down sheer faces where my fiberglass rod took a hit that would shatter any graphite rod.
 

Kyle Smith

DBA BozoKlown406
#18
Speaking of which, and slightly off-topic I know – but how can you tell the difference between the reissued "classic" or a vintage LL?
I'm pretty sure the reissue was just the 389-4 and they also did a limited reissue of the 4711-2 LL for Feather Craft. I could be totally wrong, but the original GII and GIII LL's (wow, is this English?) were 2 and 3-piece rods only.
 

Old Man

Just an Old Man
#19
I only broke one rod while walking through the woods. I was young and dumb at the time and was walking with my rod out in front like an idiot. I have since walked with my rod facing backwards. Never had a problem doing it that way. And the rod was all together at the time.

I have since then not walked farther than a few feet to fish. No brush busting anymore. Here, where I fish now, I can drive to. No walking involve unless I'm walking behind my truck to get a different rod out.
 

Kent Lufkin

Remember when you could remember everything?
#20
Speaking of which, and slightly off-topic I know – but how can you tell the difference between the reissued "classic" or a vintage LL?
Sage made just 500 of the reissued ('Classic') 389-4LLs back in the early- to mid-2000s. Each was engraved on the butt cap with that rod's individual number (mine was #50.) The reissued LLs came in a black tube with the word 'Classic' printed on the side in gold lettering while the vintage rods came in a putty-colored tube with the Sage name printed on the side in teal.

If I remember right, the reissues were originally priced at $500 or so. They weren't terribly successful in terms of sales, and I recall that the last hundred or so were sold to an online fly shop in Pennsylvania who blew them out at $350 or so each (which was a pisser for those of us who paid full retail). I think Porter still has a reissued LL and he might remember the details better than I.

I ended up selling mine in 2007 to a fellow in southern California. I figured I was pretty lucky to have gotten $395 for it.

I'm no authority on vintage LLs and have heard varying opinions about configuration of the original LLs. I believe that Kyle's post above is correct - the vintage LLs were made only in 2- and 3-piece configurations. I've seen, lawn-cast, or fished perhaps 4 vintage LLs in the past decade and all were 2-piece. It's worth remembering that back in the mid-90s when the vintage LLs were made, most rods were still 2-piece while 4-piecers were fairly rare.

K
 

jjaims

Active Member
#21
Lucky guy, Kent. A broken tip is good for a warranty replacement. A lost tip is a three piece rod without a tip section. I dropped a tip section of my Redington 4-wt in the pouring rain at a treefarm lake last spring and didn't realize it was missing until I got home. I went back the next morning and found it, but I must have stepped on it, even though there wasn't a visual break; it broke on the first cast next time I used it.

I feel like I have broken more than my share of rods. Now I try to take the few moments required to break my rod down and put it in a sock before walking with it.

D
I recently lost the top half of my redington rod carrying it out unstrung. After an hour or more of searching I gave up. After contacting redington they said just send it in and they would replace the whole thing....! Great company
 

Jim Wallace

Smells like low tide.
#23
I leave mine strung, in two pieces, with the tip at the handle, and my fly hooked on the tip-top. This works for me if I have a fly on that I want to keep fishing. Especially on the extra rods I have set up for kayak fishing. I now stow them so that they are safely under the rails of my U-12, or inside the hull (thru the angled 8" center hatch in front of my seat on my Tarpon SOT). I have snagged the tip of a fully rigged spare rod sticking out the back of my U-12 when casting, and once, long ago, I broke a rod tip when I let the current push me backwards into a piling.
I carefully rubber band both ends, but I am going thru my collection of velcro straps to find one that works for the tip and handle end. I think that the velcro strap might offer more padding and protection to the tip than the rubber band.

I usually don't break my rod down when hiking/wading along a river, unless I have to bushwhack thru some really thick tangles, or unless the trail is overgrown with blackberry brambles.

One year, for about two months of lake fishing, I never even changed my fly (Halloween Bugger), and just folded the rod in two and rubber banded it on both ends. The fly was working great for trolling and casting/stripping over dropoffs or to the shoreline, so I didn't feel the need to change anything. Except maybe for fresh rubber bands.:D
 

Kent Lufkin

Remember when you could remember everything?
#25
I use slightly smaller versions of the Velcro straps to attach to the D rings on the sides of my float tubes. They make dandy rod holders without adding any weight, especially on backpacking trips.

K
 

10incher

Active Member
#27
I have since then not walked farther than a few feet to fish. No brush busting anymore. Here, where I fish now, I can drive to. No walking involve unless I'm walking behind my truck to get a different rod out.
Adapt and overcome! Replacing the vigor of youth with the wisdom of experience. You must have seen the day coming when you wouldn't want to stomp too far to fish, since you moved to a place where you don't have to. I call that careful planning and excellent prioritizing.
 

Kent Lufkin

Remember when you could remember everything?
#29
Oh God, it hurts. I feel old, thanks Kent.
When I first picked up a fly rod, graphite rods were new, brittle, and largely unaffordable. Most folks still used fiberglass: brown Fenwick production rods ran about $30-$50; or you could buy honey-colored blanks and roll your own. Orvis owned the production cane rod market but a 2/2 Battenkill (the Chevy 283 of bamboo rods) was an enormous expense at just under $100.

My first 'real' job out of college paid a whopping $500 a month and $100 of that was dedicated to rent. It took me months to save enough to buy my first glass rod, a Pfleuger Medalist reel, and a SA Dry Cel line.

And you think YOU feel old!

K
 

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