Yakima River Temperatures

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#2
I fished early yesterday morning near Ellesnburg and noticed that that water was very warm even at 8:30am. I for one will be waiting until next week to fish. I think I'll take the family for a float instead. They're enjoy the 70 degree water more than the poor trout.
 

Peyton00

Active Member
#3
I fished it Thursday and Friday from KOA to Ringer. Lots of nice fish on Thursday. The fishing was not as good today. Dry flies both days. Did see a couple guide boats and a few others.
 

Derek Young

Emerging Rivers Guide Services
#8
Here's a concise and valid explanation - it's pretty common to hear a report that the fishing is very good without considering all the factors - just load the truck and go. How many of those 30 fish caught at 70 degrees yesterday afternoon survived? Over how many boats and anglers? Something to consider. Sure, the fish may be feeding, but releasing them after being stressed into warm and reduced oxygen water could have been their last meal. Again, something to consider. Was it so good that it was worth the risk?

http://www.hatchmag.com/articles/trout-and-water-temperature-how-hot-too-hot/771553
 

John Hicks

Owner and operator of Sea Run Pursuits
#9
I cannot agree with Derek more. As water temps rise, the amount of dissolved oxygen in the water decreases. Fighting and landing a fish in 70 degree water is unethical. Most of the rivers in New England will actually shut fishing down when water temps rise beyond 65 degrees.
 

Derek Young

Emerging Rivers Guide Services
#11
I have, or rescheduling, shifting on-water time, etc. Water temps are within acceptable range when the sun comes up. Unfortunately, that's not when most anglers are on the water. Evening floats won't make a difference, the water is warmest then - but hopefully the cooling weather coming will get temps back down quickly.

And, it's a great opportunity to educate anglers about the issue(s).
 
#12
Here's a concise and valid explanation - it's pretty common to hear a report that the fishing is very good without considering all the factors - just load the truck and go. How many of those 30 fish caught at 70 degrees yesterday afternoon survived? Over how many boats and anglers? Something to consider. Sure, the fish may be feeding, but releasing them after being stressed into warm and reduced oxygen water could have been their last meal. Again, something to consider. Was it so good that it was worth the risk?

http://www.hatchmag.com/articles/trout-and-water-temperature-how-hot-too-hot/771553
Washington should follow Montana's lead in this regard and close down trout fishing when temperatures get this high. The area has plenty of bass to catch for the few week needed for things to cool off.

Discharging more cold water from the bottom of the reservoirs would also help the trout but might put a damper of the bikini hatch.
 

BDD

Active Member
#15
It is fairly common to have warm temperatures in mid September. The high, cool water coming from the upstream reservoirs have had their spigots turned off and the river returns to its natural flow regime. With less water volume, it warms easier with the warm temperatures. The good side is once it does start to cool off, it does not take too long to cool the water down either.

Was going to take the kids out on an evening float but I decided to take them to one of the local ponds instead.
 
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