Liars! Who do you trust?

wadin' boot

Donny, you're out of your element...
#47
I read the national weather service "forecast discussion" , Cliff Mass, and Jeff Masters' wunderblog on wunderground. The latter seldom talks about pacific nw weather, but grooves on hurricanes, tornados and other massive storms. His coverage of Sandy for instance was phenomenal; current postings on climate change are very good.
 

cabezon

Sculpin Enterprises
#48
On a similar vein, sometimes I think about the poor weatherman in San Diego.
"OK, well it'll be 79 degrees and sunny today, again." And again, and again, and again. Year round I think it's 74 to 84 and sunny. An idiot could bat a high percentage there.
Along those line, in one of my favorite movies, LA Story, Steve Martin plays a TV weatherman to prerecords the weekend forecast "because he just has too much to do on the weekend to come in." Of course, a storm comes in and he loses his job.
Steve
 

Preston

Active Member
#49
Well, it's somewhat better than "the good old days", before satellites, when we knew a storm was coming when it hit the lightship at the mouth of the Strait of Juan de Fuca.

If you can see Mt. Rainier it means it's going to rain; if you can't, it's already raining.
 

Charles Sullivan

ignoring Rob Allen and Generic
#50
Seems to me that the PNW has to be the easiest place to be a weatherman. The weather tomorrow is most likely to be the same as today. During the course of a day the weather here changes less than any place that I have lived. We have little to no sever weather of any type. Very little snow, hard rain, lighting, hail etc. Honestly this is the mildest place in the US that I have been weather wise.

Go Sox,
cds
 

Stonefish

Triploid, Humpy & Seaplane Hater....Know Grizzler
#51
Not really that bad of a weekend weather wise.
With the right clothing, it was pretty comfortable.
1 for 4 on coho without a lot of folks around.
 
#58
That's cool! Care to share what waters you were in? I took my boy to the Issaquah Hatchery - there are tons of big kings pushing 30 lbs. stacked up there. They were launching themselves up the artificial waterfall in a futile, but worthy attempt to reach farther upstream. I have never seen one make it over, but I think there must be a few that make it each season.
I have been told they release some past the diversion very year.

Sent from my Nexus 7 using Tapatalk 4
 

Bob Triggs

Stop Killing Wild Steelhead!
#60
In his most recent blog entry Dr Mass has shared some information on the government shutdown and the impacts that this is already having on weather and climate forecasting, especially concerning marine forecasts. Many of the coastal ocean buoys are going offline, in part due to a lack of funding in recent years, and because of the shutdown on spending now. This has caused a problem in the verification of some forecasts, as in this recent storm we had last weekend. This has serious implications for mariners at sea, winter ocean fishermen, and any one of us who depends upon forecasting accuracy to manage their working days. Read Here: http://cliffmass.blogspot.com
 

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