Swivels for chironomid fishing?

#16
I called the Fish and Game Department about this last year because I had seen a presentation where someone had used a small swivel in their setup. After the office people discussed it with their wardens, they called me back to let me know that it was legal in a flyfishing lake if it was being used when trolling to keep your line from getting tangled. They indicated that it would be up to the field officer to determine what you were using the swivel for. Kirk
 

Irafly

Indi "Ira" Jones
#18
Good luck finding a field officer out on a fly fishing only lake to check why you were using the swivel. I'm going to go ahead and guess that they will not care.
 

timlind

Active Member
#19
Just saw this and had to comment. I started using a barrel swivel attaching fly line to leader when fishing 2 chironomids. It keeps them from tangling since it allows the line to spin. I've fished this way with 2 chironomids all summer and NEVER tangled. A different story without it.
 
#20
I had an email exchange with an enforcement officer a year ago on the legal side of using swivels and other sundry materials in fly only lakes. I asked 5 questions -

Here are the questions related to fishing on fly only lakes –
1. Can lead wire (or lead free wire) be wrapped under the body of the fly?
2. Can dumbbell eyes (not beads) be used?
3. Can we use a small tippet ring between the tippet material and the rest of the fly leader?
4. Can we use a very small swivel instead of a tippet ring between tippet and leader? Something like a size 14 swivel, which will almost float from surface tension when dry?

5. Are we allowed to use indicators to suspend our fly while chironomid fishing?

Here is WDFW Ralph Downes' answer.

Hi Jake,
As we discussed, the answer is yes to all five. I see all of your questions to relate to the construction of the lure or fly and not moving into the realm of regulatory concern pertaining to the fly fishing. Assuming of coarse that the conditions we discussed and you noted below are adhered to. A “purist” may disagree, but that will be for you and your fellow fly fishers to debate. Should you find anyone who disagrees with my stance, please point them my direction so we can resolve any questions that might exist. Please feel free to give a yell anytime and I look forward to seeing you out there………….Ralph

I was also curious about whether trout were attracted to swivels, which I always use when fishing chironomids. So last summer I fished 3 rods one day and counted "takes" on each of the rods. All three rods had the swivel hanging 10' under an indicator. Two of the rods also had a single chironomid handing 3' below the swivel (I have a two rod endorsement). After a couple of hours the count was chironomid 24 dips and swivel (no fly) 0. I don't remember how many of those takes resulted in fish to hand.

I'm not saying that they never strike at a swivel. It's just that on this day they didn't seem to be too attracted to it.
 

Irafly

Indi "Ira" Jones
#21
Jake, were you hanging the swivel in the exact same zone as the swivel? Trout will hit swivels and I simply don't want to take the chance that I'm missing zonal proximity due to swivel takes.
 
#23
My tangles when fishing this way come from casting, and from landing fish. Neither of these problems are fixed by a swivel. I personally don't find myself tangled when the two flies are hanging in the water

Just saw this and had to comment. I started using a barrel swivel attaching fly line to leader when fishing 2 chironomids. It keeps them from tangling since it allows the line to spin. I've fished this way with 2 chironomids all summer and NEVER tangled. A different story without it.
 
#24
The swivels were at 10', bur what depth were your chironomids being eaten? If the swivel is hanging 10' down, and your chironomids are being taken at 18', then it stands to reason that the fish aren't feeding at that deotch anyway.

Or did you hang a swivel at the same deptch as your chironomids were being eaten and I just misread your post
 
#25
Chironomids were 2 feet below. Point is that swivels on this date did not attract fish during the time I fished. I am not saying fish don't ever strike at them.

I find swivels handy and am not concerned whether fish occasionally strike at them. I've seen fish bite at my indicator too.
 

Jonnytutu

Active Member
#27
As another poster mentioned up here in BC swivels are a pretty standard piece of equipment when fishing chironomids, especially at the deeper depths. It helps get you line down quickly and I also find it help to turn over the longer leaders when casting. Also makes for a nice change point between mono and flourocarbon if you are running a leader like that.

Fin
 

Irafly

Indi "Ira" Jones
#28
As another poster mentioned up here in BC swivels are a pretty standard piece of equipment when fishing chironomids, especially at the deeper depths. It helps get you line down quickly and I also find it help to turn over the longer leaders when casting. Also makes for a nice change point between mono and flourocarbon if you are running a leader like that.

Fin
And as I have already mentioned, if you could use two flies with tungsten beads, like we can do here in Washington, then you wouldn't use the swivel.
 
#29
I guess I have a hard time understanding how much quicker a single tungsten beaded fly is going to sink with a tiny little barrel swivel added somewhere in line.
 

Peyton00

Active Member
#30
I guess I have a hard time understanding how much quicker a single tungsten beaded fly is going to sink with a tiny little barrel swivel added somewhere in line.
I will try and help you understand.

take an 8ft pc of 4x line- toss it in the water.
take a swivel of your choice and toss it in the water.
watch them for 20 seconds.... actually watch the swivel for a couple seconds as it dissapears into the darkness and you can spend the next 18 looking at the line on the water.

If you dont trust your knot tieing abilities, dont add the swivel. Keep your knots to a minimum and the stress down.

I gear fish alot and the swivel is a blessing when fighting big fish as they twist and turn trying to rip a plug out of there mouths. The added swivel at the hook saves many fish from coming unbuttoned. The same goes for spinners and spoons.

I can see the line twist issues, i can also see taking advantage of the weighted inline swivel that is out of the strike zones.
 

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