Tippet Rings...

#16
I guess i just view moving from horsehair/silk to vinyl/plastic is more an advancement of technology, while tippet rings, leader straighteners, and other weird stuff i see at fly shops are just "fluff". Just my silly opinion. lol. I'm sure people would look at my pack of fishing crap and say i have too much "fluff" too. Believe me, i'm not a weirdo saying everyone needs to fish with homemade bamboo rods and horsehair... it's just that when i look through the "accessories" aisle at the fly shop i just have to laugh to myself.
Well, every body has an opinion and a belly button. Your opinion is a valid as mine. I too think that sometimes I have too much dangle on my fishing vests. Who needs only one fishing vest. Right?

My comments were not intended to be argumentative.
I sometimes run my mouth when I shouldn't and I sound like a grumpy old man.
Well, two outta three ain't all that bad.

My take, is that learning to accomplish something is usually better than someone else's technology. Tying knots is part of that process for me. I certainly do not have any problem with someone seeking other solutions.
 
#17
My take, is that learning to accomplish something is usually better than someone else's technology. Tying knots is part of that process for me. I certainly do not have any problem with someone seeking other solutions.
As much as i loathe tying knots with freezing cold soaking wet hands while fish are lurking beneath waiting to eat my fly; i have to agree with you. It's all part of the process. The whole thing is part of fooling a fish... starts with tying a fly at home, then tying on a leader, tying on tippet, tying on the fly, presenting the fly with a delicate and precise cast, creating a good drift, seeing the take, the gentle trout set, the fight, landing the fish, and the safe release of the fish. It's all a beautiful process to me. For some, that process requires a few more gadgets and gizmos. It's all good.
 

Brian Miller

Be vewy vewy qwiet, I'm hunting Cutthwoat Twout
#18
I doubt that tippet rings or swivels would be legal on fly only waters. Either could be considered to be weight attached to the line or line. Curt
Interesting point. Can anyone verify?
Not to be a considered a legal analysis at all but my dry fly furled leaders with tippet rings float when greased so I do not consider them a "weight". I'm also curious to hear from someone who really knows but doubt I'd be cited unless I was being a real ass.
 

Smalma

Active Member
#19
There can be little debate that any sort of metal attached to the leader (whether a ring, swivel or lead shot) adds weight to the leader. I guess the question can reduced to at what point does too much become incompatible with fly fishing? How large of a ring or swivel crosses the threshold of becoming a weight?

I suspect that the game of fly fishing has been stretched to the point that attempting to define fly fishing or even having fly fishing only waters is an outdated idea and should probably be eliminated. Not popular idea I sure but what is a fly, or fly line, leader, etc has become so blurred that they resist definition.

curt
 

Old Man

Just an Old Man
#21
I use a leader straightener. It help get the coil memory out of store bought tapered leaders. But I'm not a gadget buyer. I don't need all that extra junk to carry around. Wait, I don't use a vest either. I just sit in my truck and tie up, step out and catch fish. I don't have to walk any farther that a few steps to fish.
 

weiliwen

Active Member
#22
Hmm, I am thinking that those who feel a tippet ring is a weight might not have actually seen on in person. They sit on top of the water like a water strider, in my experience, and weigh no more than a few inches of leader. Is a leader a weight? How about a fly hook? Tippet rings probably weigh less than the metal that makes up the eye of a #12 hook.

As for tying, well, you still need to tie a leader onto the tippet ring, so it still requires that the tippet be tied onto the leader, just usually with a clinch not instead of a blood knot or surgeon's knot.
 

Chucker

Active Member
#23
If you want to fish a second fly on a dropper, using a ring can give you a stronger connection than any other kind of knot. They are also useful for joining different materials, like braided line to monofilament. Not something I use every day though.
 

GAT

Dumbfounded
#24
Hmmmmm...... I'm not so sure those are allowed in flyfishing only fisheries in Oregon. The regs indicate that you can't attach weight to any part of the line. So you obviously can't attach split shot to leader when fishing flyfishing only waters. The rings, because they are metal, may fall in the category of "adding weight to the line".

I think I'd avoid using the suckers if you're in Oregon and fishing The Metolius.

Tying fishing knots is second nature to me (at least for now) so I'll stick with what I'm doing now.

However, at one time we did use little snap hooks for attaching secondary steelhead patterns to the leader because we could change the second pattern much more quickly than tying a knot.

I think I still have some of those things somewhere but I'm not so sure anyone sells them these days.
 

Old Man

Just an Old Man
#25
[quote="GAT, post: 879762, member: 23646"

However, at one time we did use little snap hooks for attaching secondary steelhead patterns to the leader because we could change the second pattern much more quickly than tying a knot.

I think I still have some of those things somewhere but I'm not so sure anyone sells them these days.[/quote]

You can find those snap hooks at the big box stores. But you have to hunt for them. I never used them but I bought some once. Have no Idea where they ended up.
 

_WW_

Geriatric Skagit Swinger
#26
I wear bi-focals and should probably wear something like - quad-focals...I cannot see to tie on trout flies unless I wear some kind of magnifier which I always seem to misplace or flat out just leave at home in my "other" bag. Dealing with this kind of constant handicap has trained me to pretty much tie knots by feel. Which of course brings back fond memories of night fishing, beer drinking, and canoe rolling...which of course somewhat ties in to the pissing in the lake thread...:)
 

bennysbuddy

the sultan of swing
#27
I wear bi-focals and should probably wear something like - quad-focals...I cannot see to tie on trout flies unless I wear some kind of magnifier which I always seem to misplace or flat out just leave at home in my "other" bag. Dealing with this kind of constant handicap has trained me to pretty much tie knots by feel. Which of course brings back fond memories of night fishing, beer drinking, and canoe rolling...which of course somewhat ties in to the pissing in the lake thread...:)
Sounds like you need a young personal fishing assistant !!!!
 

dryflylarry

"Chasing Riseforms"
#28
Well heck. The dang things FLOAT if you watched the video. So how can you consider them weight or equivalent to a split shot… those suckers are tiny!
 

Stewart

Skunk Happens
#29
When I bought my one and only furled leader, I chose the looped end for tippet attachment. I'm comfortable with loops so it made sense when I bought it.

In actual use, the loop usually had several twists in it which, combined with old eyes, made it difficult to attach the loops. If I get another furled leader, it will have a tippet ring.
 
#30
My brother has recently taken up fly fishing and unfortunately for both of us, I am his mentor. For some reason he has a difficult time tying tippet to leader. I mentioned using furled leaders as I had tried them once - I didn't like the teeny tiny loop at the end. I told him he could have them if I could find them. After reading about the tippet rings, I told him about those. I told him I had found the furled leaders, but he said he had went to the local fly shop and bought a furled leader with a tippet ring attached. I'm curious to see how this works out for him.