8wt to much stick for summer runs?

WA-Fly

Active Member
#1
I am planning on getting a 13' 8wt for an all around rod, it should be good for all my winter fishing but will it be over kill for skykomish summer steelhead. I want a rod that I know has the power to make quick work of any steelhead on the Sky. I use a 10'6" medium heavy gear rod for all of my river fishing, because it can handle pretty much any fish that I will encounter in the skykomish and I figured I should just apply the same principle to spey fishing.
 

PT

Physhicist
#2
An 8wt is fine. You many end up wanting another rod specifically for summer fish but an 8 is a good crossover. If you can only have 1 rod that would be a good choice.

As others will probably point out, which 8wt you choose will make a difference how it fishes.
 
#3
13' 8wt is a good all around rod, depending on your style of casting and lines that are out there you have a lot to choose from. I have a 7/8wt that I cast a 320 scandi, 390 Skagit switch up to 500 grains, it just is dependent on how adaptable you are in your casting.

I know more experienced people will chime in, but yes it is a good all around in my opinion. But it is hard to have just one!
 
#5
I would recommend a 7 13? As a all round rod for the PNW. I also started with a 8 VT2. It was just too much rod for the fish I find regularly up here. The 7 is also a good summer rod for when you have to go deep or heavy. Also cuts through the wind on the E. side for summer fish
 

Salmo_g

Well-Known Member
#6
A 13' 8 wt is a good all around rod. If the Sky were the only or main river I fished, I'd choose a 13' 7 wt however for year round use. Using rods from 16' 10 wt down to 12' 7 wt, the 13' 7 wt is what I've settled on for the majority of my steelhead fishing. I should add that I don't throw T-14 or half-chicken sized flies either. An 8 wt or 8/9 wt would do that work better.

Sg
 

WA-Fly

Active Member
#7
Thanks for all the insight, now what would be a good line airflo scandi compact or rage compact. I want to do a lot of fishing near the surface but still be able to do some work deeper water easily.
 

Salmo_g

Well-Known Member
#8
I use a Skagit head with tips for deep sunk fly fishing and a floating short head Spey (about 52-55') for surface fishing.

Sg
 

PT

Physhicist
#9
I could lend you a line or two to fish if you're in the Seattle area. Rio Powerspey in 6/7 or 7/8 to see if you like the longer heads. If not, then you can experiment with some of the shorter stuff on the market to figure out what suits your needs.
 
#10
Compact Skagit is a great line to start with. Reasonably easy to cast. That said, one question to you. Are you new at casting a spey rod?

For winter fishing you use heavier tips and larger flies. Neither of those are all that easy to start casting with.

I wasted my first year trying to fish. I threw dry line ,wet line, all lengths and weights of T small and large flies. My local fly shop loved me. I should of been trying to develop better fundamentals of casting.

I also miss read your initial post. While I think a 7 is a great all round rod, you did specifically say winter rod. A 8 would be better. Just for the fact that you can use a heavier grain head. It takes mass to throw mass. IMO a bit over kill for summer fish though

Then you can buy a 7, a 6 a 5 and what ever other spey rod you desire later. It will happen.
 

WA-Fly

Active Member
#11
Okay I'm going to look at a 7wt tomorrow, I can tackle monster bows with a 3wt single hander, then I can tackle average steelhead with a 7wt spey
 
#13
11'9" is the new 13'. I can do as much with that rod as I can with my 13'er and its over 2 ounces lighter! I fish my 8119 year-round and just switch the skagit for a scandi in the summer.
 

FT

Active Member
#14
Although a 13' 8 wt is a good all-around rod for year round use. It is in my opinion, a little heavy for the smaller summer steelhead found in the Sky, and a little light for fishing large flies in winter, but it will do both reasonably well.

Since you mentioned you will primarily fishing the Sky, I would go to a 14' 8 wt for the simple reason that the Sky is a fair-sized river, especially in winter, and the longer 14' rod would help with line control on longer casts and help make it just a little easier to reach those lies that are 90'-100' away on the Sky.

I've got to be honest and tell you that I like to use the longest 2-hander I can, which depends on the size of the river. In winter I will use my 16'er and even possibly my 18'er on the Sky, Sauk, and Skagit. I use my 11' switch rod on small rivers like the Dicky, unless fishing for coho, then I use it with a standard single-hand shooting taper because I strip the flies and don't swing for coho. And I use my 13'er on rivers like the NF Stilly, Methow, Calawah, and upper Hoh for summer runs.