Unknowables

#1
I got to thinking, I know that is sort of iffy at my age. However...

This thread will be about questions, not the answers. Most of these will not have definitive answers, just folklore and opinions. I want to ask the members for their most vexing questions, those things that have left us shaking our heads and turning to beer and philosophy.

Mine is: What the heck is happening when the lake has lock jaw? Are they not feeding on anything or not feeding on my offering? How can you find out?

I know I would pay...
 

jwg

Active Member
#4
Why do the fish in lakes only take the exact size and shape fly during a hatch and nothing else?
Are they that smart?

Food or not food, that is the question fish are faced with.

There is a lot of stuff drifting in the water that is not food.

By being selective to an abundant food source during a hatch, they maximize their successful discrimination between food and not food.

And thus fill up on nutritive food, not wasting time, energy, or gut space on non nutritive materials.

That's my take on trout selectivity.

Or were you making a joke and I didn't get it?

Jay
 

IveofIone

Active Member
#5
"....as we know, there are known knowns. These are things we know we know. There are known unknowns. That is to say there are things that we know we don't know. But there are also unknown unknowns. These are things we don't know we don't know"

Donald Rumsfeld
Oct 12, 2002

Yogi Berra couldn't have done better!

Ive
 

Drifter

Active Member
#6
I guess you didn't get it! :)

Just my way of saying sometimes it matters and sometimes it doesn't. Like Ive's post above "WHO KNOWS"
But than again I hardly ever just throw on a woolly bugger even though I know they catch fish---it's all good!
 

David Dalan

69°19'15.35" N 18°44'22.74" E
#7
How many kings will i clobber using my new secret fly, while everyone else chases summer runs? Will I wholesale convert my addiction to steel, to an addiction for swing Rex?
 

Blood Knot

Old to the board
#9
Turnover only occurs in the fall on deep lakes. The formerly warm upper strata of a lake get cooler than those waters at depth, the surface waters rapidly decent mixing the lake to an incredible degree. That is turnover.

Sent from my Nexus 7 using Tapatalk
 

Peyton00

Active Member
#14
I hike into a mnt lake. I have action all day long, great fishing. The next morning i am back on the water.....dead all day, not a single strike. I try again the 3rd day and its the best fishing yet. A leprechaun riding a unicorn has the answer.
 

Irafly

Indi "Ira" Jones
#15
Last February out at Pass lake towards the end of the day I came across a massive daphnia hatch. The swarm were right under the surface of the water, about 15 from the shore, about 10 feet across and it snaked 20 or 30 yards down the shoreline. It was fascinating watching it move slowly in and out, but more fascinating was watching my indicator drop into the middle and then promptly dip under the water for about 40 minutes. The fish were simply stacked in there with the daphnia and they were happily eating my presentation in place of the tiny little bugs.

That is the only time I have ever seen a swarm like that and I keep wondering if it happens all the time on lakes but I just don't know it because wind hasn't pushed them up against a shore and upswelled them or if that was a truly unique freak situation? If it does happen on a more regular basis, is there anyway to find the swarms in shallower lakes say no deeper than 20'? Would the existence of these swarms explain the occasional "Hot Spots" that I sometimes find in lakes when all I throat pump from the fish I catch are daphnia?
 

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