Damsels in Distress

_WW_

Geriatric Skagit Swinger
#31
I wasn't sure what to expect when I opened this thread...
A week ago my wife went to a "Party" hosted by one of her friends.
It was a "Damsel in Distress" party and she came home with a taser and some pepper spray!
 

David Loy

Senior Moment
#33
Silvercreek - Yes I read Gary L's description on fishing with flat dental floss in mountain lakes, catching the anabatic winds and dapping the surface with terrestrials. I was f'ing impressed with the concept, and wondered just how much weed was consumed around the campfire dreaming it up. But (sez I), that just might work, dapping damsels on and above the water in a breeze. Now, we just got to get to the right lake (NZ?), at just the right time....
Thanks for jogging the grey matter.
 

miyawaki

Active Member
#34
There is a book called "Dapping" written in GB I believe. In the states, dapping a Crane Fly on floss or traditional flyline with a long leader works for my friends in Idaho. I have also spent many a day dapping caddis in the downstream winds along the banks during the high summer waters of the Yakima in the canyon. I have also figured out how to hover damsels and dragons but need to test, possibly this summer.

Leland.
 

Ed Call

Well-Known Member
#35
Damn you Leland Miyawaki. That video just made me realize how depressed one could be because it has been far too long since getting a line stretched or even casting a damn fly.

I have slap cast large October caddis patterns in a few places, getting fish to launch to hit them when the fly is still airborne. Nice memory lane trip too.

Sorry for my first response. Thank you Leland Miyawaki, for reminding me what can and should be done much more often.
 

David Loy

Senior Moment
#36
So Leland, you occasionally (& actually) carry floss? I've been fascinated with the idea but never tried it. I haven't read many of GB's books and I've heard Gary L was a famous kidder, so even though it all makes sense, I haven't taken the opportunity to give it a shot. I will though. Sounds like a fun ride whether it twerks or not.
 

miyawaki

Active Member
#38
So Leland, you occasionally (& actually) carry floss? I've been fascinated with the idea but never tried it. I haven't read many of GB's books and I've heard Gary L was a famous kidder, so even though it all makes sense, I haven't taken the opportunity to give it a shot. I will though. Sounds like a fun ride whether it twerks or not.
David,
The book is called Dapping and is written by Robert Boyle. He describes the dental floss technique. I have only used a conventional flyline and a long leader and tippet.

Leland.
 

cabezon

Sculpin Enterprises
#39
I have had success with bivisible flies under high wind conditions. They sit up high on the water and you can get them off the water fairly easily. The strikes are quite vigorous.
Steve
 

_WW_

Geriatric Skagit Swinger
#40
Dapping was indeed done in the UK and still is. In my quest for vintage reels I once passed on picking up a reel that was still loaded with floss. It didn't look like dental floss but was ...stringier, fuzzier than the dental floss we are familiar with. At the time I did a little research and discovered that this type of line was/is still available.

http://www.sportfish.co.uk/dapping-floss-line.html
 

Abomb

Active Member
#41
When I lived in WY I used to fish a lake,(that shall remain nameless), that had huge trout in it. We hit it just right one weekend, the trout, some pushing 8lbs, most were 4-6lbs were lined up along the reed grass head bumping the the stalks that were loaded with damsels. They would knock them into the water and just sip them under. We stood and watched in pure awe for a good 30 min before slowly working our way out to the furthest fish and started picking them off one at a time as not to spook the rest. Man what a day, forever etched in my memory.
 

Chucker

Active Member
#44
Dapping using floss blow-line to hold the fly just touching or just above the surface is an ancient technique. It certainly pre-dates LaFontaine and Borger!.

I have used it a few times in Oregon and Washington, and caught a few fish, but it is nothing like as effective as it is on oligotrophic Scottish lochs where the fish are very hungry and wind blown terrestrials are a vital part of their diet. Over there, fish often chase the fly out of the water as it gets blown up, and sometimes they catch it.

It's also an effective technique for Atlantic salmon where they are passing through stillwaters on their way to spawn in tributaries.

I still carry a spool of floss around with my stillwater gear over here, but I'm still waiting for the day that I see trout jumping to take damsels.

N.