YNP Bears

bennysbuddy

the sultan of swing
#16
I've heard from a FWP guy that the numbers of bears in the park have been increasing in recent years. So that certainly could be part of why the bear/human contact has been on the increase aswell.

Getting stared down by griz and two cubs several years back on the Slough Creek trail is something I consider to be a profound life experience. It won't deter me from visiting YNP's back country however.
Clearly this problem is the result of the reintroduction of wolves into the open range states,or the favorable conditions the have increase the bears survival rate.
 
#17
I've heard from a FWP guy that the numbers of bears in the park have been increasing in recent years. So that certainly could be part of why the bear/human contact has been on the increase aswell.

Getting stared down by griz and two cubs several years back on the Slough Creek trail is something I consider to be a profound life experience. It won't deter me from visiting YNP's back country however.

I hiked up the Slough Creek trail a few years back with a couple of friends. The entire time (and we hiked up a couple of hours) we were yelling out, "Hey, Bear!" Got a good laugh, knowing how silly we probably seemed, but I definitely preferred that to a bear encounter out there.

J
 

GAT

Dumbfounded
#19
While it wouldn't be wise to play tag with a grizzly bear... let's put the fear of bear, cougars and wolves into perspective. Here's a chart indicating the chance of some manner of wild critter doing you in. You have far more to fear from a honey bee in your backyard than a bear in the wild ... a horse is also more dangerous than most would think (be careful Trapper!! :) ) :

Average Number of Deaths per Year in the U.S
Bee/Wasp 53
Dogs 31
Spider 6.5
Rattlesnake 5.5
Mountain lion 1
Shark 1
Alligator 0.3
Bear 0.5
Scorpion 0.5
Centipede 0.5
Elephant 0.25
Wolf 0.1
Horse 20
Bull 3

(I'm not exactly sure where you go to find a deadly elephant in the US but there's a 0.25 chance it will do you in if you find one.)
 

Trapper

Author, Writer, Photographer
#20
While it wouldn't be wise to play tag with a grizzly bear... let's put the fear of bear, cougars and wolves into perspective. Here's a chart indicating the chance of some manner of wild critter doing you in. You have far more to fear from a honey bee in your backyard than a bear in the wild ... a horse is also more dangerous than most would think (be careful Trapper!! :) ) :

Average Number of Deaths per Year in the U.S
Bee/Wasp 53
Dogs 31
Spider 6.5
Rattlesnake 5.5
Mountain lion 1
Shark 1
Alligator 0.3
Bear 0.5
Scorpion 0.5
Centipede 0.5
Elephant 0.25
Wolf 0.1
Horse 20
Bull 3
Gene - that was very funny about the horse and I don't disagree with you that statistically people are much more likely to be injured or killed by other animals. But lots of people ride horses in NYC Central Park and Los Angeles where there are lots of bees, spiders, and dogs. :) There are no bears there. I would guess that 90% of NYC residents and LA residents have never even been in bear country, so those millions of people aren't going to be injured or killed by a bear. But lots of fly fishermen end up casting flies to trout in bear country. Did I ever tell you how I really distrust statistics?:p

I don't want people to be afraid of fishing in bear country. I do it often and I'll continue to do it. And yup, I'm more likely to be killed while riding my horse than attacked by a bear. (Side note: I've been thrown from a horse twice while we were flanked by wolves. I got a serious concussion one time. If I had been killed it would have gone into the "killed by a horse" statistic.) I just wanted to alert folks that something seems to have changed this past year in regard to bear brazen behavior that is not usual. I don't know what it means and it's anecdotal, but I thought it deserved to be addressed.

While I don't doubt the above are genuine statistics, it reminds me of a conversation I had with a friend who worked in Glacier National Park. He gave me that statistics of the number of bear attacks in the Park vs the number of annual visitors. If you looked solely at the numbers you'd say that your chances of going through GNP and even seeing a bear were about the same as winning the Powerball.

Let's say the numbers were 1 in 30 million that you'd be injured by a bear in the Park. I asked him how many people visit GNP annually who NEVER even get out of their vehicles. He didn't have stats on that but guessed it was likely at least 50%. I asked him how many visitors got out of their cars and ventured more than a mile from their vehicle. He said he didn't know but it was a small fraction of visitors.

The odds of people backpacking through the back country of GNP and being injured by a bear are still very small, but they're not Powerball small like the stats indicate.

Trapper
 

GAT

Dumbfounded
#21
I've spent a goodly amount of time in the coast range of Oregon since 1973... guess where the highest concentration of black bear is in Oregon? Yup... the coast range.

Have I ever seen one? Nope. Decades in the coast range and haven't seen a single bear... footprints, yes... actual bear? Never. The only black bear I've seen in Oregon was the doomed sow and her cubs at East Lake campgrounds.

Now.... I have seen plenty of bees and horses on a frequent basis so I'm glad I always carry bee and horse spray ... just in case... :D

(somewhere I need to find some elephant spray)
 
#22
Ok enough of this unnecessary bear paranoia. Let's be clear the deadliest animal in north america has yet to even be mentioned, which animal kills almost 200 people per year in the US.....Bambi!

 

Attachments

ScottP

Active Member
#23
The wife and I spent a night at Bridge Bay campground in YNP last spring. Got the bear speech from the folks as we registered (they informed us a few blacks had been in the campground the past 2 nights); although I've heard it many times before I listened attentively and we assured them we'd store everything properly and keep our site clean. Woke up the next morning, stuck my head out of the tent and found our neighbors to the left had left open beer bottles (not all empty) and their campstove with frypan sitting out over night, while our neighbors to the right had left out open water jugs and partially filled trashbags. I half-expected to see their tents shredded and partially digested remains strewn about but only heard a lot of very loud snoring.
We bugged out before any of them woke up but I did leave notes on their windshields thanking them for putting themselves, us and everyone in the campground in danger; doubt very seriously it did any good.

Best bear encounter I had was at First Meadow on Slough. We got there early in the morning, expecting it to be busy and found it empty so we started fishing; had the whole place to ourselves for hours then discovered why - a grizz was hauling ass back and forth about 1/2 mile away; took turns kept an eye on it but it never came any closer and the fishing was great.

Regards,
Scott
 

GAT

Dumbfounded
#24
Ok enough of this unnecessary bear paranoia. Let's be clear the deadliest animal in north america has yet to even be mentioned, which animal kills almost 200 people per year in the US.....Bambi!
Yes, but each one of those cases was self defense (they tried using anti human spray but it didn't work) :)
 

Tracker

Active Member
#25
[quote="GAT, post: 915122, member: 23646"

Average Number of Deaths per Year in the U.S
Bee/Wasp 53
Dogs 31
Spider 6.5
Rattlesnake 5.5
Mountain lion 1
Shark 1
Alligator 0.3
Bear 0.5
Scorpion 0.5
Centipede 0.5
Elephant 0.25
Wolf 0.1
Horse 20
Bull 3

[/quote]

So an average of 122.65 people per year in the US, killed by some type of critter. I'd like to see the statistic on how many of those thought it would never happen to them....
Unlikely because....well...they are gone. Game over.

Sent from my ADR6350 using Tapatalk 2
 

Old Man

Just an Old Man
#27
I've had more close encounters with bears in Washington than I have here in Montana. I continue to fish up in the hills as I like it there.. I have only met up with Mountain Sheep in my travels in the hills but I keep a watchful eye out for anything wild out there. Flybill wants to fish with me because he can run faster than I can.
 

Karry

Lost in Nontana
#28
A secondary problem with bear becoming accustoming to people is it can end up killing the bear



But instead of moving them far off to NE Oregon so they would be no problem, they killed all three. That was their solution. They claimed they couldn't move the bear because they'd return -- yeah, right... the ODF&W couldn't figure out some remote spot to move the bear so they wouldn't somehow find their way back to the campgrounds at East Lake? BS. Killing the sow and her cubs was easy so that's what they did.

Now there are now signs in the campgrounds at East indicating that if you feed any bear that show up, the bear will be shot and killed so don't feed them.

That's how our Oregon fish and game manages wildlife.

Idiot humans.
Bears do return.
A friend I worked with years ago also ran bear and cougar hounds. They would also help catch bears for Fish and Game Dept to relocate them. Often they would just return if they could not find the food they were custom to. One bear was relocated from Provo Bay to the Uinta Range and was back in 2 days. That's over 100 miles as the crow flies, and that's some ruff country. People from Ut may remember this from late 80's.
 
#30
Great thread, Trapper. Thanks much! ScottP, when I see campers in the parks acting like your neighbors, I immediately summon the LEO. Maybe it will save a bear's life. Typically, it isn't pretty and can lead to a serious ticket and ejection, as it well should. GNP seems to be more serious about campground security than YNP. The campground hosts there are on it, and will summon a ranger in a heartbeat. In YNP, I frequently see coolers, grills, and other kitchen items sitting on the picnic tables all day and night. Not a good thing.