Box is stocked! (sort of)

#1
Finished up my "spring tying" for the lakes! the time is upon us and having a good stock of flies (still not even close to enough if you ask me but will do for now) is a good idea. Always gotta be prepared, this is just a general range of patterns i know work in colors that hatch where i fish, plus the experimental pattern here and there. Just bought more bobbers and swivels,too. i'm such a dirty bobber fishermen ;)









-Brandon
 
#2
Finished up my "spring tying" for the lakes! the time is upon us and having a good stock of flies (still not even close to enough if you ask me but will do for now) is a good idea. Always gotta be prepared, this is just a general range of patterns i know work in colors that hatch where i fish, plus the experimental pattern here and there. Just bought more bobbers and swivels,too. i'm such a dirty bobber fishermen ;)









-Brandon
Very nice!
 

Irafly

Indi "Ira" Jones
#3
That'll do pig, that'll do. For a start anyway. Now work on some different sizes. You most likely already know this and probably have your reasons for placing the flies in the box the way you do, but just in case the slots are designed to trap the bend of the hook. So sliding the hooks in the opposite direction so they are easy to pull out and they don't then ruin the foam. Then again they are far less likely to fall out this way.
 
#5
gene, swivels have many benefits, but the main reason is weight. really good way to get your chironomids down quicker,especially when fishing deeper water.It also does a great job of keeping the leader perfectly straight in the water column so your flies are in better relation to the bobber. you've never used swivels for bobber fishin'?

ira, yeah i am aware i put them in wrong but for the exact reason you specified. it's a double sided fly box and has my river flies in the opposite side, i figured i would secure the flies as best i could, i hike and fish a lot of coast range streams and often hop from rock to rock or have to climb stuff, so my flies will tend to fall out and get all mixed up if i don't secure them good.
 

GAT

Dumbfounded
#6
Nope. Never used swivels. I use two flies and knots.

I can't bring myself to use both a bobber and spin gear swivels ... even I have limits :D
 
#7
hahaha. i don't blame you gene, i know a good amount of people that would cringe at the sight of a swivel on a fly rod, but i wont question it.. works great! ;)
 

GAT

Dumbfounded
#8
I've used swivels with my lipped bait fish imitations when fishing for bass. They are required so the "fly" moves from side to side instead of spinning when retrieving.

I'm not exactly sure where a swivel comes in for indicator fishing. We've always used a heavy pattern or split shot at the bottom of the tippet material and then a lighter weight midge emerger pattern as the upper dropper or target fly. I've never really had a problem with the presentation. The weighted fly or split shot normally drops the patterns directly below the indicator and at a right angle.

Maybe I'm missing something really important with the swivel aspect.

But for heavens sake.... most spin swivels are larger than the size of the midge emerger patterns I'm using!!! Sheesh. I'm trying to imagine the set up you guys use. No wonder you need a larger bobber to keep it from sinking due to the weight below the sucker! :D
 

Irafly

Indi "Ira" Jones
#9
I would advise moving away from using a swivel for what you mentioned. You are better off using two flies with tungsten beads. Swivels if not used correctly will interfere with the sliding of your slip indicator system but more importantly you'll end up with some false positives with your indicator. You may think that your missing takes, but in reality the fish are eating your swivel. They are likely to now know that something is up and therefore less likely to stick around in the area to find the real flies. Although I have heard that some people use the false positive as one more way of deciding where the fish are staging, but I think it would be near to impossible to tell the difference between a missing a fish taking your fly versus missing a fish that took your swivel.
 
#10
thats why i use black swivels, fish can still see em' but i'm sure they are less appealing than silver or gold. i definitely get what you are saying but i think ill keep my rig the way it is, it seems to be doing just fine ;) i will also add the swivels i use are small crane swivels, not big super heavy flashy swivels you see gear guys use.





-Brandon
 
#13
i can't find any good photos, but ill try to explain. butt end of leader (usually 2x) >swivel > 4ft of 4x > point fly> 2ft of 4x >dropper fly. swivels are also easier to cast than split shot and tangle less, at least for me.
 

GAT

Dumbfounded
#14
I don't get it. I'll search The Internet to see if I can find a diagram. The split shot I use is the smallest they make (smaller than BB size) so it isn't any more difficult to cast than a swivel. But normally, I don't find that I need one. The two patterns with bead heads normally add enough weight for the patterns to sink at a right angle to the surface.

I'm trying to figure out the value of the swivel. How does it change the presentation of the patterns vs knots?
 
#15
Gene, maybe it is just personal preference.There may not even be an advantage to it, i think there is but who knows. Thats just the way i was taught, ive tried going without a swivel with and without split shot and it just doesn't seem as smooth and effective to me.If you watch a lot of stillwater videos on youtube you will see Brian Chan, Phil Rowley, and other pros also use swivels.im sure if you browse some videos you will find the answer. I'm far from knowing what im talking about, i just know it works so i wont mess with it haha.One thing different about your rig besides not having a swivel is both of my flies are tied inline on non slip loop knots.

we will have to fish bobbers one of these days and compare.
 

Latest posts