Juvenile Coho

Rich Schager

You should have been here yesterday...
#1
Fished for a couple of hours off Harstine Island for SRC's. Didn't catch or see SRC any activity. Did however, catch 4 wild juvenile coho, all 6-8". Thought this was rather odd, as I was straight across from the Squaxin netpens. I wasn't surprised to catch coho, but thought if i did catch any that they would be hatchery fish. Squaxins were supposed to have released all 1.7 million juveniles by now, including 300,000 at the end of June. Haven't caught any, nor seen any schools.

 
#2
Fished for a couple of hours off Harstine Island for SRC's. Didn't catch or see SRC any activity. Did however, catch 4 wild juvenile coho, all 6-8". Thought this was rather odd, as I was straight across from the Squaxin netpens. I wasn't surprised to catch coho, but thought if i did catch any that they would be hatchery fish. Squaxins were supposed to have released all 1.7 million juveniles by now, including 300,000 at the end of June. Haven't caught any, nor seen any schools.
Rich:

I have been looking for recently released net pen coho for the last month or so. I have not seen any of these fish but may have LDR a couple of small ones.

For the past month the sea-run cutthroat fishing has been okay but nothing to get too excited about. I was usually able to land a couple of fish(medium sized with an occasional larger one) each outing. However, mid to late Spring the sea-run cutthroat was often excellent particularly with top water patterns.

I was out chasing after sea-run cutthroat on July 5th and water temperatures varied from 59 to 61 degrees F. Reading should be mid 65 degrees or above by next week with all the hot weather predicted. I am going to stop fishing for sea-run cutthroat pobably until mid-Sept. when the water temperature should be in the low 60 degree F. range. It appears that the fish have scattered out or headed to deeper cooler water. Plus, I don't want to stress sea-run cutthroat when water temperatures are high with lower oxygen content.

Roger
 

Go Fish

Language, its a virus
#3
I caught two in 40 minutes just north of
Treasure Island last weekend. One 12 and
one 14 that put up quite a tussle.
Dave
 

Bob Triggs

Stop Killing Wild Steelhead!
#4
Rich:

I have been looking for recently released net pen coho for the last month or so. I have not seen any of these fish but may have LDR a couple of small ones.

For the past month the sea-run cutthroat fishing has been okay but nothing to get too excited about. I was usually able to land a couple of fish(medium sized with an occasional larger one) each outing. However, mid to late Spring the sea-run cutthroat was often excellent particularly with top water patterns.

I was out chasing after sea-run cutthroat on July 5th and water temperatures varied from 59 to 61 degrees F. Reading should be mid 65 degrees or above by next week with all the hot weather predicted. I am going to stop fishing for sea-run cutthroat pobably until mid-Sept. when the water temperature should be in the low 60 degree F. range. It appears that the fish have scattered out or headed to deeper cooler water. Plus, I don't want to stress sea-run cutthroat when water temperatures are high with lower oxygen content.

Roger
This is one advantage to fishing up north on the Admiralty Inlet area waters this time of year, where we have some stronger tidal flows and colder incoming tides. The water is often a little colder. But we still have the problem of back bays, enclosed waters, shallows and flats etc., gaining heat during low tides and sunny hot days, and then transferring that heat into the flooding tide waters later. So we have to pay attention to that too, and be careful about where and when we fish. When the weather gets as hot as it is right now, and it will be for some days ahead, we can opt to limit our fishing to the cooler deep water areas on the open exposed shores, and we can fish very early in the day, before it warms up, focusing on incoming tides from about half tide onward, to allow the near shore shallows to cool off a little. Very few people seem to be talking about this thermal stress issue on sea run Cutthroat. But it is one of the finer points in responsible stewardship. http://olympicpeninsulaflyfishing.blogspot.com
 

Tacoma Red

Active Member
#5
This is one advantage to fishing up north on the Admiralty Inlet area waters this time of year, where we have some stronger tidal flows and colder incoming tides. The water is often a little colder. But we still have the problem of back bays, enclosed waters, shallows and flats etc., gaining heat during low tides and sunny hot days, and then transferring that heat into the flooding tide waters later. So we have to pay attention to that too, and be careful about where and when we fish. When the weather gets as hot as it is right now, and it will be for some days ahead, we can opt to limit our fishing to the cooler deep water areas on the open exposed shores, and we can fish very early in the day, before it warms up, focusing on incoming tides from about half tide onward, to allow the near shore shallows to cool off a little. Very few people seem to be talking about this thermal stress issue on sea run Cutthroat. But it is one of the finer points in responsible stewardship. http://olympicpeninsulaflyfishing.blogspot.com



True but I think the cutts tend to avoid that water anyway unless there is a preponderance of bait.
 

Tacoma Red

Active Member
#6
I'm referring to the fish's (cutts, salmon, herring, etc) ability to detect temp changes better than us and therefore avoid warmer water.