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I have two 4wt. rods now a St. Croix 8ft 4 piece and a 2 piece 7'6" Reddington. I would like to get a longer 4 for those longer casts and better nymphing possibilities. Should I go with the 8'6" or the 9", I am thinking about the St. Croix AVID Series. Any comments on the length and the rod brand would be helpful.
 

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A collector never stops collecting!
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Go for a 9' or 9'6" if you want to focus on high stick nymphing. If fact, I would probably get a 5wt or 6wt since you already have two 4wts. I haven't cast the St. Croix's, but consider TFO, Echo, some of the entry level Sage rods. Lots of good options out there, just have to down to your local shop and give them a try and hopefully buy through them.
 

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Joe Streamer
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I have an 8'4" Scott G2 4wt that is the best longer 4wt I have ever cast (and I have cast and owned many). I have also cast the 8'8" G2 4wt and that was nearly as nice. I bought the 8'4" version because it had a bit better feel in shorter casts but could still accurately present a fly 50' away with ease and 60' if you really get a hold of a cast. It's best with dries of course, but not bad with small streamers.
 

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I fish a 9' 4wt as my primary trout rod on middle-size rivers. I like the versatility of being able to nymph if I would like and the 4wt (combined with a fast-ish action - mines a Z-Axis) helps when the wind picks up and handles small streamers very nicely. The trade-off, of course, is that the length plus action make it a not-so-good choice for fishing in close quarters (casts in the 10-20 foot range), though I've partially mitigated that by trying a few different lines to find one with a bit more weight that will load the rod a bit better in close. I've also fished a mid-level (can't remember the model) Loomis 4wt in an 8'6" length before this rod and it was great too.
 

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I use a Snowbee Diamond Rod that is a 10 foot 4 wgt for nymphing and casting teams of wet flies. Great rod, though, like most other rods I've tried in that length, it needs a little heavier reel to balance things out.

REE
 

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If you're a stealthy wader an 8-footer will high stick just fine. I find the 8' 4wt to be the 9' 5wt of small and medium streams. Those and an 8-weight and you're ready for almost every fishery in Washington.
 

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Long Lost Member
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I've got a slew of 4wts, none are 10' but I can do pretty much any type of fishing with each of them. If you want to buy another one, buy it, or use what you've got and spend that money to expand your range?
 

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If you plan to use the rod for nymphing medium sized rivers go with something 9' plus. If I were you and allready owning two 4wt, I would step up to a 5 or better yet a 6wt which will give you much more versitility in fishing. The 6wt will have more backbone, giving you the ability to use the rod for light saltwater yet not to much rod for a 12 inch trout. If you would like to throw some meat at brown trout a 6wt is much better than a 4wt or 5wt due to the size of flys. Also note, Winston has discontinued their Accent, Vapor and BIIX rods this year and you can probably pick one up for a great price at your local fly shop.
Just my two cents
 
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Try casting it and see how it feel.s

Stew
I don't know how long you've been fly fishing so take this advice accordingly. Stew's advice is best, in my opinion. Everyone has a unique, if I can put it that way, style of casting. Both may be great rod's but, you may end up loving one and hating the other.
Don't make the mistake that
 
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