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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
For those who are interested in the history of fly fishing and or swing dry lines for salmon, steelhead or trout this book is a must read.

Greased LIne Fishing for Salmon [ and Steelhead] by Jock Scott wiht an introduction by Bill Mc Millan, published by Frank Amato.

I will quote from Bill McMillans foreward as it can not be better stated.

Bill McMillan-
"Historically Jock Scott's fortunate portrayal of A.H.E. Wood and his methods of greased line fishing for Atlantic Salmon will always be considered one of the few landmark books in fly fishing's 500 year recorded existence. Mr. Wood himself stands uniquely alone through the course of that history as the one man to whom a major fly fishing method can be so directly attributed.
Wood's use of the line mend must be considered one of those deceptively simple inventions that could have eluded anglers for many years. "

I did not find this to be a fast read. There are many observations that gave pause to thought. Then there is the technique and it's descriptions as how to best use the Wood method of swing in different applications.

Dave
 

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Dave -
I agree an interesting read that is best taken in small chunks. I first read it more than 25 years ago; at that time I had done a fair amount of experimentation with dry line presentations (focusing on the surface) for summer steelhead. I thought that having some experience with surface presentations was helpful in distilling some of what Wood had to say and applying that to our steelhead game.

A really important mesage for those that read this work is the role line control has in successful getting steelhead/salmon to take on the surface. That line control is much easier to learn on the surface as the whole game is visible and how the fry reacts to your line manipulations is there in front of you. The line control learned with the floating line is directly transferable to the sinking lines; the benefits from that control will be obvious in the fish's reactions to your fly as it swims.

If you enjoy the surface game during the summer/fall (and even at other times) visitng or revisiting Wood's methods during the long nights and high waters of winter is a nice break from the time at the fly vise yet still fly related.

Happy holidays
Curt
 

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What a coincidence. My wife is spending Christmas in England with her family, I'm home nursing a cold, tying summer steelhead flies, listening to folk music and thumbing through "Greased Line Fishing" and "Northwest Angling" by Enos Bradner, another good read.

Merry Christmas,
Leland
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Curt, like always it seems you are so right. This book has to be taken in small chunks! There is a lot to digest. I thought I was doing alright swinging flies until I read this book and then started to refine what I was doing. I didn't have much time on the water before the rains and freeze showed up but I am pretty convinced I made a jump.
In that you have read the book there was something that left me puzzled for quite awhile. Wood kept stating how he was casting across streams. I had the mental image of standing on one side of a creek and casting over to another creek on the other side. Why wouldn't you just cross over and fish the other creek. Then the light went on and what the Brits call a stream is what we call a seam! Those Limeys really do play havoc with the language!

Leland, I wasn't aware of Enos Bradner's book. That I will have to look for. Many years ago when I was just a mere fledgling I was honored to meet him on an outing to Loop Lake. It was several years later that I realized good old boy Enos was in fact the Enos Bradner. I still have a fly he gave me for Brookies.

Merry Christmas to everyone and thanks for your thoughts and ideas.

dave
 

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Dave -
Bradner's "Northwest Angling" is a good read; I too had just re-read it several months ago. Since it was the first fishing book in my "library" it has long had a special place in my collection.

While not just a "fly" book it does provide some interesting historic information; some of which is in conflict with some of today's convential wisdom.

Tight lines
Curt
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Curt, One of the first things I learned in studying science was that what we know today is most likely going to be usurped tomorrow by additional information and data. Dr. Dixie Lee Ray literally beat that into my grey matter!!! She was my advisor at the Uof W. However old ideas still have merit and should not be tossed aside. there is something there that is valid and sometimes should be reviewed and brought into the new picture when applicable. If I can roughly paraphrase an old statement- What we know today is based upon what someelse knew before us. It is up to us to decide if there is validity!

Dave
 

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Dave - you are so correct that science is built on the works of others and over time we see collective improvements in our understandings and knowledge.

What I enjoy about re-visiting Bradner's is his observations and stories from the 1940s. Among the thinks that tickled my fancy were the stories of the early days of Pass lake, sea-run cutthroat fishing, and observations about the steelhead of our rivers during that period. We often speculate about such things and it is fun to read the accounts of a first hand witness.

Tight lines
Curt
 

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I was lucky enough, I guess, to pick up an old "inscribed copy" of Northwest Angling a couple years ago out in an antique store in Montesano. The pages are fine, but unfortunately the front and back cover have slight water damage. The inscription read---"To Anglng Judge Sutton- Tight Lines and Screaming Reels-1950 Enos Bradner". Anyone know who Judge Sutton is? I paid $4.50 for the book!
 
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