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i'm new to fly fishing. i have been told src are out there, however i have had no luck yet . can anyone suggest a bech close to the everett area? tips and tricks would be helpful too. thanks for any help you can give:thumb
 

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Sure I can help you. Two things; Picnic Point just south of Everett, but before Ted's Sports Center and don't buy Sonics Seasons tickets. Thank God spring training is starting up.

Matt

"Everyday that you wake up and decide not to go fishing...is one less day you'll go fishing." Forrest Maxwell
 

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I'm new to this site too, although i've been fishing around this area since I was knee-high to a grasshopper. Picnic Point and the Park South of the Mukilteo Ferry is a good place to start. Good luck!
Rich
 

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You don't need to go deep, some fanatics (Leland Miyawaki, for instance) fish poppers for them on the surface. I've never used anything but a floater or an intermediate line. They'll often be feeding right up in the surf line on an incoming tide so, when wading, it's always a good idea to make some of your casts more or less parallel to the beach. The old rule of thumb when fishing from a boat was to keep the bottom in sight and cast toward the beach.
 

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what do i know, im just a stupid kid

when can we expect srcs to start picking up in our everett fisheries? when do they make their journey back to the salt? i have never fished for them anytime other than summer/fall season. they truly are a wonderful fish.

~sean~
 

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The peak of the sea-run cutthroat spawning season is in March but there are probably some fish spawning from February through May. Some have already spawned and returned to salt water by now while others have not yet entered their natal streams. Sea-run cutthroat exhibit the most varied life histories of any of the salmonid fishes and, because they lack the commercial importance of salmon or the glamour of steelhead, they are probably the least-studied.
 
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On the topic of sea-run cutthroat being among the least studied of the salmonids, that may be true. But there is one great resource, although not really "scientific," that offers a good bit of analytical information on SRC's - contained in Steve Raymond's "The Estuary Flyfisher." The whole book is a great read, sort of a how-to manual meets homage to fishing the rivermouths and salt. But within it, Raymond has compiled a couple of decades of notes on SRC behavior which is probably of mild interest to the practicing scientific community, but of great interest to anglers like us. Or at least certainly it was to me. I'd recommend the book highly, especially to an angler who is new to flyfishing and interested in the salt.

Anyway, his couple of decades of statistics show that the beginning of January may be the peak of fish activity in the Puget Sound estuaries, with the beginning of February being the absolute lowest point for activity in the annual cycle. October and November are the other two best, consistent months for fish activity. He also says that the middle two hours of a slow-moving incoming tide in the morning, or the middle two hours of a fast-moving outgoing tide that begins in the mroning and carries over into the afternoon are likely to be the best for SRC fishing. :professor

Whenever or wherever you wind up going, good luck. :thumb

-Teeg.

Reduce, reuse, recycle...it works for fish, too! Practice catch and release
 

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I'd be happy to help if I knew more about the saltwater. What I can offer is company to go fishing with. I live in the Silver Lake area...e-mail me directly and we'll hook up some afternoon or weekend.

Roper,

Carpe Carpio
 

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I grew up fishing src off of bainbridge island and all over hood canal. There are a lot of good spots off of camano island as well.
You can pretty much fish them year round and have good luck. I like to find areas with a rocky shore and high current. Try to invest in a "slime" line if you can. It is a great investment for fishing the saltwater.
 

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All the places mentioned plus Golden Gardens, any park along the Sound. A ferry ride opens a lot of teriitory - Fort Flagler/Marrowstone Point, Point No Point. A favorite of mine is Widbey Island because if the wind is beating you up, it's just a short drive to the lee side.

The problem with surf fishing, especially on the Seattle side, is good weather brings out a lot of folks that are clueless about a backcast - definately catch and release and probably bad Karma if you hook one.

Grab your Atlas, explore and have fun:thumb
 

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If you are interested in learning about what is published in the area of "Sea Run Cutthroat trout", just enter that phrase on a search engine, like "Google.com", and hold onto your hat. It will take a whole fishing season, with out coffee, fishing,or sleep for that matter, to read it all.Im sure you will agree that there is way more published and researched on SRC's than you ever imagined.

Some of my best moments in SRC fishing have been late march through early may, and then in the fall,sept through early nov. at least for big fish and many fish days.

I like swinging a big streamer, like a matuka, or sculpin, but on a hook no larger than a number 6 - so we don't kill them with a bigger hook- about two feet depth over six to eight feet of moving water, usually with a light sink tip or intermediate line. I like moving water best and fish it as a river current, since the fish often line up in that current like they are feeding in a river.

My bigger fish have all come on bigger, slower presentations at deeper depths. A few doozies on the surface proved to me that a small popper or foamback fly can work really well. Especially if it's skittered or jigged or stripped quickly. They also munch an drifting Adams like a piece of candy. A favorite fly for me is a small, #12 scud or shrimp, in olive with black mono eyes. I had a 40 fish day on that one!

I have caught many SRC in the few feet, and even the few inches, at the edge of the beach, and standing 30 feet away. Next time I'll try a lawn chair, for stealth,(and for maintaining my currency as a bona-fida member of "Team Sissy"!).
 
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