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From Fly Rod and Reel and Ted Williams.

http://flyrodreel.com/proposal-eradicate-californias-bass-population-withdrawn/
see the note below the article:

Particularly on the Yakima, bass decimate salmon, according to the cited study, to the tune of 84% of salmonids consumed by bass 12" in length and smaller.

"
-Ted Williams
My friend Dr. Bill Bakke of the Native Fish Society offers this:
"The states of Oregon and Washington have done away with limits on non-native p redacious fish to protect endangered salmonids in the Columbia River and tributaries. Smallmouth bass less than 12 inches consume 84% salmonids in the Yakima River, Washington. The effect of Non-native fish species on salmon exceed the adverse impacts caused by habitat loss, harvest, hatcheries and hydro dams. Removing non-native species is imperative for salmon recovery."
Supporting Evidence:
Sanderson, Beth L., Katie A. Barnas, and A. Michelle Wargo Rub. 2009. Nonindigenous Species of the Pacific Northwest: An Over looked Risk to Endangered Salmon? The American Institute of Biological Sciences.
"The results indicate that the effect of nonindigenous species on salmon could equal or exceed that of four commonly addressed causes of adverse impacts-habitat alteration, harvest, hatcheries, and the hydrosystem; we suggest that managing nonindigenous species may be imperative for salmon recovery."
FRITTS, ANTHONY L. AND TODD N. PEARSONS. 2006. Effects of Predation by Nonnative Smallmouth Bass on Native Salmonid Prey: the Role of Predator and Prey Size.Transactions of the American Fisheries Society 135:853-860.
"Overall, most of the salmonids were consumed by smallmouth bass smaller than 250 mm (69.6%), and the vast majority were consumed by smallmouth bass smaller than 300 mm or 11.7 inches (83.6%)."
"

Jay
 

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That is a bit of a half baked smoke screen or cart before horse logic. Smallmouth numbers would be a fraction of what they are without the Columbia dams. Pike minnow numbers would also decline. On top of that the pooling or slowing of flows due to dams, which slows out migration allows for more extensive predation.

I can't ever recall a big bass with a smolt in it's mouth but I have caught 11"ers with as many as three in various stages of digestion… and that scenario has always occurred in slack water well off the natural river bed that would not exist without the dams.
 
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