Washington Fly Fishing Forum banner
1 - 2 of 2 Posts

·
Flaccid Member
Joined
·
3,875 Posts
just remember, throw 'em back

i just got back from flyfishing my aunts bass pond. they are a very tough fish, let me tell you. through several years of fishing for bass with a fly rod and with conventional tackle, i quit trying to flyfish like i spinfish, if that makes sense at all. instead of imitating what i do with my spinning rod (fishing grubs and spinnerbaits) i have had much, much better success fishing completely different. i have found that bass generally strike lures out of curiousity rather than feeding; while they strike a fly out of feeding instinct. this curiousity is great when fishing with a spinning rod when you can make more casts and cover more water and more effectivley create this curiousity. but when you have your fly rod in hand, it becomes harder to cover water. you just really cant flyfish like you can spinfish. instead i flyfish for bass by showing them something they cant refuse by matching the hatch (i hate that phrase!) and trying to get them to feed. at about this time of year the bluegills have completed spawning and you can find good action fishing flies that correspond to the size and coloration of the bluegill fry. due to excellent water conditions i spent a considerable amount of time just observing the bass. i found that a lot of bass were cruising the shoreline (1'-2' of water) looking for bluegill fry which hide among shoreline growth. however, bass are VERY oppurtunistic and react well to terrestrials as mention in another post. if you encounter fish feeding on the surface, stop and watch. you can tell very quickly if it is a bass or bluegill that is feeding by just listening. bluegill make a distinct popping sound when they take something off the surface. while a bass makes more of a slurping swirl. I found one of my best fly patterns was a grasshopper. this time of year grasshoppers are very plentiful anywhere there is grass. just look for a spot with a steep shoreline (quick access to deep water) and shoreline vegetation like reeds/cattails and/or milfoil. a gusty wind of any kind can work wonders. it ruffles up the surface so the bass feel safer in shallow water and it either (1) blows food from the mainlake towards the shore, or it (2) blows terrestrials off the shoreline and into the water. good in either occasion. just throw a grasshopper or adult damsel fly or a small minnow imitation or a frog up tight to the weeds and do lots of twitching and lots of pauses during the retrieve. try throwing a live grasshopper into the water and observing what the hopper does and how the bass react to it. i did this over 30 times at my aunts pond and the hopper got eaten maybe all but 5 times (usually do to my spooking the fish or *the grasshopper being dead*). i also found that if the hopper gets eaten instantly and/or with a large splash it was usually because there were multiple bass in the area. probably because of competition. when the bass just sucked it under it was either the largest bass in the area or it was the only bass (lack of competiton). i dont pretend to know everything about every body of water but i surely spent enough time experimenting and observing on this particular body of water to have learned a few things about how bass react in certain situations. bass are highly complicated critters that i believe are every bit as wily and every bit as "smart" as our local trout and steelies. just my $.02. if you would like anymore info i'd be happy to share more of my experiences with you. you be surprised how much observing i do for an impatient 16 year old. i geuss i just like to catch fish and observation has led to many a bass for me.
 
1 - 2 of 2 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top