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Well, few days ago found myself on a small lake that was home to some beavers (as i later found out). My buddy and i had already taken a lap around the thing having only caught one. After releasing it we heard a loud slapping noise, so we headed towards it, hoping that it may be some large bass we could throw poppers at. }(

Anyways, upon nearing the area we were surprised by what we thought was a muskrat surfacing. On the contrary, it lifted a VERY large and very thick tail out of the water and began slapping the water with it. Damn that is loud, and very intimidating. Having not known what this means, we used what i assume is common sense and left the area and a pretty good clip for being in float tubes. We later left the lake as fishing was slow. :hmmm

Anyone know exactly what this behavior was? I think it may have has something to do with a warning or territorial notice of some sort. I'm sure others have had their run ins with these critters while in search of some fish, any answers explanations or peculiar stories would be more than welcome!!!:beer2

Fly For Fun

"Trout Don't Live in Ugly Places" - Alex Higala
 

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That slapping thing happens all the time. It usually happens at dark. I've fished little cutthroat bogs in Western WA and been off the lake and out of sight and they will still slap the water. It scares me every time. You get used to it however and end up laughing at yourself that it startled you.

On a few occasions, I have seen beavers appear to be heading right for me and then they "false-charge," if you will. Who knows what they're doing. Maybe they're playful like otters. Or maybe its all about territory. Regardless, the trout don't seem to mind a bit and its common to see continued surface activity in the proximity of where all this slapping is going on.

Beavers...

Sparse

Streams are made for the wise man to contemplate and fools to pass by.
(Sir Izaak Walton)
 

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Fish Recycler
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Once as a kid I was sitting on a log that crossed a small trout stream. I was drifting (Kmart) flies downstream (on a spinning rod)for trout that were having none of it. But I was sitting very, very still - when I heard a gentle thud on the log.

I turned my head, and a young beaver was just heading out onto the log. I remained still, and he walked slowly clear out to me. He reached me, eyed me, tested my leg with one of his paws, decided that I should not be crossed-over, then turned around and headed back to shore, where he went into the weeds, and then appeared in the stream, and swam across.

I've had a few good ones since, but that has remained one of my favorite wildlife encounters.

Teeg.

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You can be a fish recycler, too. Let 'em swim.
 

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Idaho Resident Craftsman/Artisan
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Oh shiz, not the beavers!

I've had beavers slap the water and almost give me a heart attack.

There are 12ft. long beavers on Henry's Fork. One night in the full moon light 2 of my buddies were chased by an enormous alligator like beaver. This thing chased them so vehemently they almost drown. hahaha They have a NASTY bite as you can imagine.

Now you fellas please don't get your panties in a bunch but I carry my .40 cal for beavers and bears cougars and wolves and badgers. If I ever have a nasty run in with a beaver you can bet I'll be looking like Daniel Boone with a beaver skin cap next time you see me.

MAC
 

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I've got a family of 5 that live in a lodge behind my house. I find myself doing more and more night fishing, and like Thoreau said..."I'm not sure it's the fish I seek." Being out there in my little boat in the dark with the family circling around, slapping their tails, is special. And, with all the tail slapping, it doesn't seem to affect the fishing. Sure, they've used 4 or 5 of my fruit trees in their lodge construction, but that's a small price to pay for what they add to the natural word.
 
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You should try hooking one accidently with a 10 weight spey rod and a 1/0 Scampi. It was exciting for about two seconds and then I realized I was best served to break him off and now! Felt very sorry for the chap but boy can they smoke a reel :D

It was at first light one morning and he was swimming up river between me and the shore. I had 80' of line dangling while I decided to snap a picture of him as he swam by. Snap goes the camera, beaver takes a hard right, line gets caught under his neck. I am frantically trying to mend it over his head but it didn't work. The one leg of the V of line got shorter and shorter and then Beaver On! I straight lined him and tinked him off right away and then watched as he swam to shore and sat there on the rocks scratching to get the hook out.
 

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I remember the first time I had a run in with a beaver. I was 12 and fishing the Madison and it came cruising right at me like it owned that piece of water. I let him have that stretch and the other 200 yards that I quickly put between us. :)

As for the tail slapping. You are correct that it is a warning to other beavers that something is not right in their little world and they need to be vigilant. :eek
 

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Patrick
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If it was not for the beavers the land we all love would be quite diffrent. I wish I can remember the name of the man who was an English man who past him self off as an Indian and who worked as a trapper for years untill after he married a true indian and changed his life to protecting the Beaver of Candada and had a part in the first protected lands in Canada. The newpapers found out about and kept his secret until after his death that he was not really an indian. Because of him and a few other the beaver in Canada were saved from being trapped till there was none left. If not for those efforts the beaver would be gone and we would have less wet lands and a very diffrent land. After he died the story that he was not a true indian came out and his reputation was ruined for years and its only in the last few years his work has been recognized again. I wish I could remember his name if any one out there knows who I am talking about can you please refresh my memory. Its been years since I read up on this man who did so much for so many of us.
 

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Stop Killing Wild Steelhead!
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There is a really nice little book, been out a few years now, called: "Water, A Natural History". The author is a woman named Alice Atwater,(no kidding!). She was the principal sanitarian for the Boston Harbor cleanup project.

She wrote a great book about the history of water in North America. This includes a significant role played by both the beavers and the prarie dogs, and a man named John Jacob Astor of New York City. Old John Jacob Astor was a real tycoon of the ninteenth century and amongst his many ventures was procuring beaver pelts for the fur felt industry. Mostly for men's hats.During this venture he almost singlehandedly wiped out the beaver from North America.

Mr Astor had a few places named after him in New York and elsewhere. One was the Astor Place intersection of Astor Place and Lafayette Street in the East Greenwich Village area of NY. Another place was the old Astor Library, which is now the Public Theater,( started by Joseph Papp). There is a beautiful design of a beaver set in the ceramic tilework at the Astor Place subway station there, now nearly 200 years old.

That book is a great read for anyone interested in the big picture of the water resources of North America.

I used to fish a small stream in Connecticut that was fly fishing only. A really nice little spot. I fished it at sunset a lot. The beavers there got so used to seeing me that they raised their young wityhout concern for my presence. When I was fishing alone at night there they used to swim right up to me. The little ones got very friendly. Many people have made pets of beavers. I would not recommend that generally. But if I had a pond with a few beavers in my backyard I think that would be a really cool thing. And I would probably spoil them with carrots and apples.
 

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AKA Beadhead
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Well this is not a beaver story per se...
I was once out in my float tube in a saltwater bay in the South Sound one evening as the sun was going down. Small salmon were rising to something other than what my epoxy minnow was imatating. There was not a drop of wind. It was so quiet you could hear voices from across the bay. All of a sudden there was the loudest slap on the water. It echoed throughout the quiet bay. I nearly jumped clean out of my waders and ran across the surface to safety, (If I was a cartoon character I certainly would have). All I could think of was visions Jaws or worse, all the time feeling very exposed with my legs dangling below me. After my heart finally slowed down I saw a harbor seal surface just beyond my casting range. I knew they slapped the water like that but I had never been so close to one.

I later hooked a small chinook (8-10") on a dry fly (stimulator).

Bh
 

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I hate float tubes for that reason!!

I will never use a float tube...no matter where I go.

I attribute my fright of float tubes to JAWS!!!! cause I know he can live even in freshwater lakes and I want to keep my legs :eek . I guess its kinda like old man's fright of heights....well mine is of my legs under water where I cant see the surprise attack. and im not too proud to admit it :thumb

~Patrick ><>
 

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I thought this topic was going to be completely non-fishing related for some reason.. Too funny...

I don't have any fishing related beaver experiences, but when I've been out hunting ducks in Central WA, they seem to be everywhere. I try to stay away from them because beavers carry gardia, otherwise known as "beaver fever," which both humans and dogs can get. I've never drank pond water, but the dogs I hunt with do and several years ago one of them came down with gardia. It was a huge pain to get rid of and since then I curse beavers everywhere when I see them.

}(
 

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I hate float tubes for that reason!!

I have the same fear when fishing the salt in my pontoon boat, except my fear lies with the seals and my schlong. I fish for SRC's at the mouth of streams near my home, and every time It gets around the slack tide they come out in packs. While I cast from by boat ( with my legs spread open) I am constantly reminded of the platform I designed but have yet to build, and end up leaving before I have had enough fishing. Nothing like the thought of those teeth coming up out of the water and trying to get a bite of my Danish Sausage.

:eek
 

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Just an Old Man
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I hate float tubes for that reason!!

I forgot what I was supposed to remember.

mtlhead,quit dreaming. You swore off woman. So you have nothing to worry about and since you don't go out anymore. You can't get hurt sitting in you shop.:p :p :p :p :+ :smokin

The unkown poster}(
 

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No, it wasn't metronidazole. My old dog was almost in liver failure several months prior to that (due to the arthritis drug Rimadyl), so she couldn't take that drug.

What was a pain was disinfecting the environment. Having to clean her crate, bedding, and bowls every day for a week wasn't fun. Plus she had to be seperated from the other dogs.
 
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