Washington Fly Fishing Forum banner
1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
323 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm recovering from abdominal surgery at the moment, so won't be on the water for a while. That means some time to tie flies, read fishing books, and drool over gear online.

I've been thinking about spey rods for a while now, and attending Aaron's "Day on the River" clinic really whetted my appetite. I'm considering options for spey rods/switch rods and could use some input.

A few things to note:
1) I plan to attend more of Aaron's clinics before I buy a rod, so this is not going to be something I purchase right away.
2) I'll most likely purchase from Aaron's shop, as I value the time he puts in offering his free clinics, and will likely get the chance to try out several different rods before I make a purchase.

As such, I'm mostly looking for some early suggestions on what types of rods to try out, rather than a "this is what you need" answer.

My current rod is a 6wt Redington 5-piece (1 hander). I use a 5/6 Okuma Helios reel and a 5/6 Arlbright Bugati reel with it. I also have an old 7wt Montague rod that's kind of a crappy fiberglass setup, but serves as a decent backup rod.

I figure that the 6wt rod will continue to be the main rod I use on stillwaters and creeks, so what I'm looking for in a new rod is something for use fishing for salmon and steelhead, particularly on larger waters. Potentially I may want something I can use in salt water as well.

My original inclination was to go for a switch rod, so that I could use it in a variety of different situations. From what I've read, the benefits to a switch rod are that you can do long spey casts with it, but also easily do some short casts with it, as well as easily feed line out for a downstream drift. However, I've also read they aren't the best choice for a beginner to spey, as they sacrifice some of the benefits of a dedicated spey setup.

Any thoughts on that?

If I do go with a dedicated spey setup, a Skagit rod (compared to a Scandinavian or Traditional) setup seems like a good choice for steelhead/salmon on local rivers. Not that the other choices would be bad either, but the flexibility of the Skagit rod appeals to me.

What do you suggest as far as size/weight? I'm a beginner, but a fast learner, and don't want to have to "upgrade" in a year if I can help it.

Also, since the majority of what's on your spool is running line, do you need to match the reel weight? If I'm using, say, an 8-wt setup, can I put it on a 5/6 reel, or am I better off with an 8wt reel to match?

I'm aiming to keep my cost under $200. Is that realistic, or am I better off putting the money away for now, and saving up for a rod in several months?

Thanks,

--Tracy

(PS, If any of the above doesn't make sense or is unclear, please ask. I'm on pain medication after my surgery and might not be as articulate at the moment as I could be.)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
158 Posts
Save save save the line alone is $ 150 and you try not to buy used line everything else can be used there a lot guy that buy new rods and sale them used because--- well i don't know why but they do and the fish don't care what rod is used. If you are going to stay in the sport for a long time a set up that will last 10years or a life time is around $1000 new. Talk to Aaron is your best bet
 

·
A collector never stops collecting!
Joined
·
4,895 Posts
It would be hard to get a rod for much less than $200, even used in my opinion. I had a setup that I could have let go for about that price, but it is now gone.

For the rod I would guess around $150 would be the low end, for a decent 13' to 14' 7/8 weight rod. I would target that and look at some of the classified and other online sites for the rod. I personally think that you would be better off saving a bit more money before you seriously look and just go to the Day on the River and try out all sorts of different actions and price points. Deer Creek and Echo rods would be the first I would look at, although there are other options out there.

The reel, you can go on the low end for $50, something like an Okuma or discontinued reel. Aaron does have some smaller Vogg reels available, however what reel you decide on will be determined by the rod and line you select. You can save the most money here, since this will be the least important of the three necessary items, the rod, reel and line.

A good floating line will run you from $75 and up, if you decide on a multi tip line or when you want multiple lines, that price will go up. The line choice will depend on what rod you decide on and if you want to Skagit cast, Scandi or spend time learning first with a quality floating line.

You're welcome to try a few of my setups when you recover and I'm sure I'll see you down on the river on Saturdays or Sundays.

Bill
 

·
Team Umiak
Joined
·
412 Posts
TMIB,
So if you are planning to purchase from Aaron, why not ask his opine? If not Aaron, the guys in Monroe are straight up..and Mike Kinney works/guides out of that joint..and provides Sunday classes on the Sky..free. And Poppy at the Red Shed in Idaho..he'll give you straight scoop with your Qs. All I believe are sponsors of this site..so gr8 to enlist their help. Just my $0.02.
Eric
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
323 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
TMIB,
So if you are planning to purchase from Aaron, why not ask his opine? If not Aaron, the guys in Monroe are straight up..and Mike Kinney works/guides out of that joint..and provides Sunday classes on the Sky..free. And Poppy at the Red Shed in Idaho..he'll give you straight scoop with your Qs. All I believe are sponsors of this site..so gr8 to enlist their help. Just my $0.02.
Eric
Oh, I plan to ask Aaron a ton of questions, don't worry about that. This is just armchair ramblings and wonderings as I sit here in recovery. From the early feedback though it sounds like my best bet is to start putting some money away as I continue to go to the clinics.
 

·
Team Umiak
Joined
·
412 Posts
Bro..been there done that w/ a broken neck..it sux. Been in the armchair ramblings and drugs/alcohol before..so keep up the fight for comin back to the passion. I'm a noob to all of this..but it's therapy for me..an expensive one, but wtf.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15,541 Posts
If doing it on the cheap matters, you ought to consider "rolling your own." The cheapest good entry I know of is a Rainshadow 11.5', 6/7 wt; you can build this for about $125 or so. Next is a Beaulah 13', 7/8 wt. The blank is more, but this is a high quality piece. And i t goes up from there.

I'm not sure about switch, but I have an 11.5' and 12' that are kinda' like switch, but also Spey. Works for my appllications, but I have other rods as well.

Anyway, rod builiding is a nice pass time while you're recovering. Along with tying some flies. Also you could build your own lines and save a few hundred bucks.

Sg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
684 Posts
Tracy,
The world of spey is like many things these days in that it is very specialized. To be perfectly equipped you would need to have a quiver of rod/line assortments to choose from as you work your way down the river. The assortment would be different for every river. Kinda like a golfer chooses a different club for every stroke as they work their way down the course.
To get an all-arounder I'd say you'd need to have some idea of what size rivers you are going to fish. After that it depends on allot of personal preference. I agree with the others here in that by spending time with Aaron and asking questions you will get a good start. After that you will be able to direct yourself toward what you like best--which will probably change.
Good luck, you are going to have great fun!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,359 Posts
Definantly talk to Aaron. Talk about fishing. Not about casting. Everyone gets caught up on the casting. What you really want is a rod/line setup best suited for the type of fishing you plan on doing. Be open minded about this. Are you thinking of fishing new methods? New waters? Water that was previously thought unfishable with a single hand rod? Or just fishing the same waters and methods you are used to fishing, but with a two hand rod? One rod will not do it all. But one rod with several different lines, can do a lot.
 

·
No longer here
Joined
·
4,034 Posts
My goal when I got my first double handed rod was to replace my singler hander 8 wt for steelheading. I wanted one rod that would cover most potential fishing situations- didn't plan to acquire a whole quiver of long rods and still don't plan to. I started with a 10'6" 7/8 switch rod but quickly jumped up to a 13'6" 7 wt Spey rod. Casting was much easier (more forgiving) with the Spey rod- the switch rod left no room for error, and there was (and still is) plenty of error.

You'll likely want a couple lines (I chose a compact Skagit and compact Scandi) so you'll want a reel with a spare spool because each head will have it's own size running line. I think the biggest consideration in a reel for this application is to get one with a solid drag mechanism for fighting large fish, and make sure it balances the rod. There are many good rods to choose from, and not all will break the bank. Cast many and see what feels best, then start saving! Actually, start saving NOW!
 
G

·
do yourself a favor and go the the shop in monroe A.A.T.F. Mike workes there and I dont know why you would consider anything else. Get it straight from the man. NO BRAINER....
 

·
BAMF
Joined
·
369 Posts
i would save the money for a good decent setup and fish the decent setup till your a jedi with it and then perhaps sell it and upgrade to something top of the line.

i bet for $500-$600 bucks you could score a decent setup

a used older "top of the line" (but still in great shape) sage, loop, cnd, or loomis rod can go as cheap as $250( i would say $350 average)
a used click and pawl style reel, large enough to hold the line setup you could find for $100 or so.
backing $5
new running line $30
a new skagit or scandi head $50 ( i just saw a on-line site selling rio skagit heads brand new for $20 in there bargin section)
a 30' coil of some "T" style tip material ( for you to cut up and play with) $25
a type 3 or 6 tip $25 each
and a couple polyleaders. $12 each

this is just an idea and nothing to definitely go by and only examples, not suggestions. i have built setups for around this price but i also did a lot of leg work trying to find the deals. one thing to remember is once you get a reel and line setup( if using a modular style line setup) you can easily switch the reel to a different rod in the future, all you would have to do is buy a new head to match the new rod.
of course if you have the patience and will power to save the money i would buy all new from some guys like Aaron, AATF, or Poppy. buying new would cause less stress and confusion and you would be reasured that your rod is perfectly setup.
 

·
Fishin' to the end, Oc.P
Joined
·
2,311 Posts
My goal when I got my first double handed rod was to replace my singler hander 8 wt for steelheading. I wanted one rod that would cover most potential fishing situations- didn't plan to acquire a whole quiver of long rods and still don't plan to. I started with a 10'6" 7/8 switch rod but quickly jumped up to a 13'6" 7 wt Spey rod. Casting was much easier (more forgiving) with the Spey rod- the switch rod left no room for error, and there was (and still is) plenty of error.

You'll likely want a couple lines (I chose a compact Skagit and compact Scandi) so you'll want a reel with a spare spool because each head will have it's own size running line. I think the biggest consideration in a reel for this application is to get one with a solid drag mechanism for fighting large fish, and make sure it balances the rod. There are many good rods to choose from, and not all will break the bank. Cast many and see what feels best, then start saving! Actually, start saving NOW!
iagreeiagreeiagree......................check the classifieds for a reel
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
323 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Thanks for all the suggestions and ideas. I think my best bet at this point is to just plan to attend more clinics once I'm better and get a better idea of what I want. I thought perhaps I could get a few answers now, but since I don't even really know the right questions yet, I'll just wait until I'm better informed. My inclination now is to put some money away and probably target next year's winter season for getting my own gear. I'm guessing that will wind up being a spey rod setup rather than a switch, but I'll make that decision later.

In the meantime, I'll continue to use the gear I have.

Thanks,

--Tracy
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top