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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Have you ever heard the term boondog or boondoggling?

I heard this term is a NW word describing how loggers would fish behind log boons where the boons or chains holding the boons together would dredge the bottom a la henry forks shuffle. Loggers would fish behind the boons for a personal advantage during work.

In modern parlence, it has referred to the idea of taking advantage of a business trip for personal enjoyment. Well, I had a business trip to Oregon and decided to grab my rod to cast a few rivers before crossing the Columbia that I had never wetted a line. My reward was a unique experience. I popped off the hwy and found an open stretch of river with an enticing run less than five miles from I-5. I lined my rod and started to fish the head of the run with clear determination. Ten cast into the top of the riffle I hooked into my first summer steelface that I can say for the longest time (noting I have not made a concerted effort for a while considering our poor summer run counts). It was a big shoulder hatchery fish. It was as big as many winter runs I have taken in yrs. No pics and I decided to let the fish go as I was going to work for the next 3 days with no realistic opportunity to use the fish.

It was a moment to remember. Ever work hard every day and wonder about "boondoggling". To do it and hook up with a beautiful steelhead in 10+ casts is amazing. They always say that the last thing you would say on your death bed is that I wish I would have spent more time in the office. I will always remember the small chance at boondoggling that ended in a beautiful steelhead.

To add to the story is the the pact with my fishing buddy. Catching a steelhead is still a unique moment. To balance the karmic forces, you must share at least two flies that caught the steelhead. I fished with my best and most difficult flies (a unique akroyd). Must tie...must tie....and it was worth it.


Joe
 

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Joe, it's still a term used for drifting with the flow of the river. Usually with a jet boat. So not a term that has died out in fishing circles, just used for gear fishing still to this day.
 

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Log "boon"? I think you mean "boom". Jerry's definition of the term, as used in fishing, is right on but as to its origin, that's obscure. Perhaps it has something to do with the dictionary definition: "work of little or no value done merely to keep or look busy", perhaps a guide's sarcastic comment on his dudes, sitting in the boat holding their rods while he maneuvers to put their gear in front of the fish.

And what the hell is a "steelface"?
 

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No kidding, that was meant to be an ironic comment on the increasing use of hip and trendy, cutesy-poo nicknames for fish. What's wrong with calling it a steelhead? I find "cutties", "rezzies" and "ho's" equally repugnant; at least "steelhead" has a legitimate etymology; the generally accepted explanation is that, when steelhead were still legitimate commercial prey their harder and, generally, thicker bones (particularly the skull) made it necessary to apply the coup de grace two or three times rather than the one blow necessary for most other salmon.
 

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Preston, I've always heard it was termed by loggers. I know my Great Uncle used to "boondog" as he floated down with the logs when he worked for St Regis. But do know it was a term used by alot of loggers back then. So no idea if that's the true start.
 

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Pointless, unnecessary and wasteful work. Seems to make sense. Companies send staff on trips as perks veiled in them being "work related" and we call them a boondoggle. I've heard of boondogging flies or drift gear, thought it was specific for trailing the boat/craft/float (or if it originated in logging, the mass of logs floating from point a to b). If boondogging can put a fish on the hook I'm not against giving it a go when all the drifting, swinging, skating and nymphing has been done the way I've been shown. Who cares if it picks up fish!
 

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I was talking with a friend that used to captain a tug in AK.
If the work was done, he would tell the crew they could fish off the back of the log boom.
Seems like the salmon liked having the cover as the tug moved the logs out to sea.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I've always heard the term related to side activities off of work. I swear I read about this connection to following log booms somewhere in a fishing book. Don't remember where. Regardless...or should I say irregardless since I may mistakenly creating my own word meanings.

Use to be a restaurant back in Raleigh NC named Irregardless because the owner/chef was continually corrected by his teachers that it wasn't a word

Joe
 
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