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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does anyone know if the WDFW has ever tried to plant browns in any of Western Washingston's streams? I know they are big on protecting the "native" fish, but I've always wondered how browns might fare in say, the middle fork of the snoqualimie. Would planting browns in a stream or too, make it possible to catch decent sized non-migratory trout on a westside river? Are there just not enough bugs in westside river to produce decent sized fish? I bet they could fatten up chowing on 3 inch cutthroats.
 

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Be the guide...
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The only ones I'm aware of are in SW Washington. Check with Stacie Kelsey at WDFW, she may be able to give you some pointers. Keep in mind the actual rivers\creeks may not be stocked, but some of the lakes that are stocked have inlets and outlets that the fish move into....

Email = [email protected]
Washington Dept. Fish & Wildlife
Region 5
Southwest Washington
 

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Chances are a Brown Trout planted in W. Wash Streams would soon follow alevins downstream and become a sea going Brown Trout in no time at all. Not enuff food in W. Wash streams,salmon and steelhead fry aside to sustain larger ones.
That's what seems to have happened in Argentina and Peru I understand.
Hmmmmm, this could be a worthwhile experiment, though with all the problems involving native salmon and steelhead runs will probably never happen.
 
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YOU'RE RIGHT!!!!

There are absolutley NO big trout in any Western Washington streams or rivers. You HAVE to go East to catch anything big. I repeat, you must go to the Central Washington parking ponds to even be considered a "Real Fisherman." Go East young man, and keep going. There are not, have not, and will not ever be decent size fish caught West of Goldendale! Thank you. You can redeem your Rose Garden parking passes for free parking at the Ford or Lenice/Lenore.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Perhaps they could be planted in a stream above a waterfall or something that blocks the migratory trout and salmon. I know that brown trout don't tend to overpopulate a stream the way cutthroat do. I fished the Bow river near Banff, Alberta once about 8 years ago. This was way upstream from the more famous stretch below Calgary. The water had that slightly milky look to it beacuse of glaciel melt and seemed to be nutrient poor, i.e. no vegitation. I still was catching some fun little browns in the 11" to 14" range. I just have a feeling that they would do better than the tiny 6" to 10" native cutts.
 

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Just an Old Man
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YOU'RE RIGHT!!!!

I used to know it all---but now that I'm older I seem to forget it all.

You are all wrong. Fish in Western Washington rivers Are good size. Many years ago we used to always catch decent sized fish out of these rivers. And they wern't all Steelhead. I can still catch cutts out of the rivers high in the water sheds that go 14". You probably don't think thats big but out of a small mountain stream that is a good sized fish and they are fiesty. I don't think that these and sea runs because they are over 50 miles from the salt.
 

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YOU'RE RIGHT!!!!

I totaly agree with you on that.
There actualy may be some smaller browns out here, but I have to wait till it stops raining so much for the water levels to go down. There could be bigger ones up stream behind the beaver dams/waterfalls like you said. A 14 inch searun will fight harder than any of those dead eastern hatchery trout of yours. Searuns are not the only large trout out here there are rainbows in the 20 inch range. Just because every other cast you don't catch a 20 incher doesn't mean they aren't out there.
You must be one of those type of people who think real fishing is about how big the fish are and your Ford truck. Which probably means that Rocky Ford must be heaven for you.
You know I have an excellent kiddy pond with a hatchery I would like to sell you! Hey I will even throw in a free spin rod.
 

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Fish till ya drop.Then suck it up and fish the evening hatch.

Huskytrout, a blockage,even a dam might keep the salmon and steelhead from getting upstream to the brown trout area, but it would not keep a hungry brown trout from migrating downstream to a salmon/steelhead spawning area to chaw on eggs and fry. The possibility of large trout of any sort, other than the occasional exceptional sea run cutt, in W. Wash streams is just not ON.
 

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OK guys - I think Big Ben was being a little sarcastic. I'm sure he knows there are a number of fine rivers and streams on the west side that have good numbers of nice sized wild resident trout. Just don't ask for directions :smokin
 

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o_clarki
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Maybe they would do better, but then we just have another exotic species on the loose. Imagine native cutthroat fishing, especially in some lakes if we wouldn't have introduced exotics.
Also, sea-runs in the salt are up to 20+ inches which I don't consider small trout, and if you know where to go, you can get into those beauties on a regular basis.
I don't believe cutthroat overpopulate that easy and if they do, food shortage or habitat limitations will quickly make a dent into the population. Nature has a funny way of balancing itself.
Also, native cutts get a lot of fishing pressure in freshwater, so as soon as they are in harvestable range 8 -14 inches, people start frying them up. I believe natives used to be a bit bigger than they are now, just because of fishing pressure and selective fishing.
Just my $.02:beer2
 

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YOU'RE RIGHT!!!!

If anyone living in eastern Washington should have the nerve to come over to our side (let me make that more clear) MY side to catch anything, and if I should happen to pass them on my way to their side (let me make that more clear) MY side, then I'm going to spit my gum out of the window and give them an obscene sign when it splatters on their window.
I would like all of us on the westslope to remember this: it is hell living in eastern WA. Mind-boggling heat, soul-numbing cold, dust, dirt, wind, all that is foul is all around them all the time, but the worst I have saved for last: eastern Wasington is almost always crawling with mossy arm-pitted, mildew-odored, sopping wet-haired, red-eyed, grizzly faced, loud and, needless to say, disgustingly obnoxious west slope trash!!!
Makes me want to move to Oregon except, as we all know, it is fished out.
Browns are not all as good as the gold they wear during the spawning time. There are problems.
1. They tend to be much more cannabalistic than other trouts. Streams tend to fill up with these nasty old hogs and WDFW can't plant tub fish because there are gone about 20 minutes after the "supplementation to the fishery."
2. Browns get very smart, very fast. In lakes, the pop gear boys do nail a few from time to time but in rivers forget it. Even finely tuned, exceptionally talented fly fisherman like myself have difficulty. And when I get skunked, I get surly. I start writing more nasty things about the "fish munugers."
3. Browns would probably ruin what little there is left of our native fishery. I rather doubt they would become anadromous, at least not in our life time.
4. But I do love 'em. And I've arranged to put a few of them in my sights as soon as the runoff is over.
5. Finially, to my dearest and only Washington friends, do I need to say I love ya?
:thumb
 

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I have heard rumors of browns in the Yakima, and checked it out some. There are a couple guys who told me they caught one, usually at dusk, in a deep pool, on a wooly bugger.

It seems that if there truly are browns in the system, they must be somewhere in the Yak drainage. I intend some serious exploration this summer.:thumb

Tom
 
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