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I don't know about "easy to see" but this is my favorite Callibaetis emerger pattern. It was shown to me by a friend who got it "from an old-timer at Lake Chopaka". I've modified it over the years and call it "the Chopaka Emerger". I anoint the whole thing with floatant because I want it to float horizontally in the surface film.

The tail is combed out sparkle yarn, the abdomen and thorax are Nature's Spirit Callibaetis dubbing and the wingcase and "brush" are coastal deer hair. I usually tie it as a size 14.

Sky Tail Feather Flowering plant Wing
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I don't know about "easy to see" but this is my favorite Callibaetis emerger pattern. It was shown to me by a friend who got it "from an old-timer at Lake Chopaka". I've modified it over the years and call it "the Chopaka Emerger". I anoint the whole thing with floatant because I want it to float horizontally in the surface film.

The tail is combed out sparkle yarn, the abdomen and thorax are Nature's Spirit Callibaetis dubbing and the wingcase and "brush" are coastal deer hair. I usually tie it as a size 14.

View attachment 117407
Thanks Preston. I'll give it a try. I just spent a week at Corbett lake BC. Fish were rising and i was using a Quigley style fly as were others. I hooked fish but not as many as i should have.
 

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Just a note about the manner of the emergence of the Callibaetis mayfly: It has been my observation that the
Callibaetis nymph positions itself horizontally on the surface film to emerge from its nymphal shuck. The nymphal shuck splits along its dorsal surface and the adult pushes itself forward and out of it. Sometimes the empty shuck itself might, in this process, be pushed down and below the film, but normally the shuck (which will remain floating on the surface after the dun has fully emerged) trails on the surface. The pattern, as it was originally shown to me, featured a wire rib, apparently to sink the hook shank (in the manner of the Klinkhammer). One of the first changes I made to the pattern was to eliminate the wire and, in fact, I dress the entire fly, including the sparkle yarn representing the shuck, with floatant to try to maintain its horizontal attitude.

It probably doesn't matter a great deal since all sorts of mishaps can occur during the process of emergence but I'm reluctant to meddle with what has proven to be a highly effective pattern.
 
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