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Mark Steudel
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This may not be a very good angle for any sort of diagnosis, but anyone care to take a look and give me some pointers?
Couple of issues (not necessarily in the video):
1. Problem getting tight loops accurate loops, e.g. getting the fly to tuck under some overhanging branches
2. The line looking like it's fine, but then the fly just puddles at the end

My setup
  • Rod is a 11ft 4wt Echo Deer Creek,
  • OPST 200gr line,
  • with 7ft/2ft 5ips MOW tip
  • OPST laser running line.
  • 3 ft of 0x and a small bead head bugger.
TIA, Mark

 

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Slow down. Your sweep shouldn't be mono speed; it should accelerate. Second, finish with your rod tip higher. Any time you drop the rod tip down, you'll open the loop.
 

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+1 The first thing I noticed was the speed. Second, the OPST is a waterborne anchor so it seems to me there should be a slight pause between your snap-T and your forward cast. That should allow a slower delivery.
 

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To add to what Big Tuna said, stop higher, and accelerate to a sudden stop. Like you're trying to fling some mud off the end of your rod.
 

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Just went and looked that up, I'll have to try that out!
Don't take this wrong but if you didn't know what a single spey was or how to perform one I suggest you find someone that knows how to cast a two handed rod and have them help you learn a few basics or better yet find a certified instructor and get a few lessons. The single spey should be the first cast you learn and perfect.
 

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Mark Steudel
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Don't take this wrong but if you didn't know what a single spey was or how to perform one I suggest you find someone that knows how to cast a two handed rod and have them help you learn a few basics or better yet find a certified instructor and get a few lessons. The single spey should be the first cast you learn and perfect.
No offense taken! Would love too, just don't have the time yet.
 

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To add to what Big Tuna said, stop higher, and accelerate to a sudden stop. Like you're trying to fling some mud off the end of your rod.
Change that mud to dog poop and you'll have it.
Of course you know that abrupt stop is what turns that leader over, right? Over exaggerate it, stop it so hard the rod rebounds. It'll help to use a light grip during your strokes, both back and forward, then gipping the rod hard at the stops, that'll tense the forearm muscles and help the stop. Try using an unweighted fly, at least for experimental purposes.
Now for a controversial comment; try putting your right foot forward, a lot of spey casters do. What that does is put you into a position that you can block the movement of your right arm. For example what foot do you put forward when you throw a frissbe? There's no follow through involved in either movement. If you don't believe me check out some competitive distance spey casters on you tube or any Scottish spey caster. (Andrew Toft)
 

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Take all that right foot forward stuff with a grain on salt. It won't cure your 'stramash' problem, but it is a good style none the less.
I do have to take exception with what Kerry S. said. Don't mess with a single spey, it's a diabolicaly difficult cast to master. Stick with your sanp t's and double spey's. They're easy and more importantly they're ideal for a short head and weighted fly. Get competent with those two casts then........
 

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Oh; and after rewatching, you're throwing your anchor along way up river. It should be landing pretty much on your target line (a rod length away from you) If it's not you're loosing potential energy and when the line finally comes out of the water it's not coming out straight , it's coming out from an angle BAD (look up the term bloody L) That holds true with the double spey too. An since I can't get out of italics I'm going to leave now. :D
 

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I would try slowing down the overall tempo of the cast but not by much. Maybe think about it more than actually doing it. The only thing I think I see is your anchor seems a little far away. Try experimenting with your anchor. Your cast looks good. Just remember that a small change can make a BIG difference in the performance of your cast. And I am in the minority here, but I've never understood how the single spey relates to sustained anchor casting. These videos are going to contradict some of the above, but is just another point of view.
 

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Mark Steudel
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Thank you everyone for the feedback.

Any suggestions on getting my anchor to place closer to me more consistently? That wasn't something I realized I needed to do, so I don't know how hard it will be to consistently do it once I'm on the water.
 

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Thank you everyone for the feedback.

Any suggestions on getting my anchor to place closer to me more consistently? That wasn't something I realized I needed to do, so I don't know how hard it will be to consistently do it once I'm on the water.
On your snap t finish with your rod tip pointed further down river. And try using your bottom hand more through the sweep and less top hand.
 

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On the snap land the fly closer to you, about 5 feet or so--and snap it gently, reeaalll gently. Use your lower hand to do all the casting--feel the rod load and cast with the lower. Your hands are down near your waist--try raising bothto where your lower is even with your stinky armpit in its distance from the ground and on the forward cast drive your lower hand into your arm pit.
 
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