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There's a crab larvae and inshore shrimp imitation by Eric Balser in Flies of the Northwest ( 1998, Inland Empire Fly Fishing Club). The pattern is tied on a #6-8 hook. Tail: Long Guinea fibers. Body: Blue dun hare's ear. Eyes: Black Mono, tied at tail of hook. Wing: Gray-Green Pheasant Rump laid flat along the hook shank (General Practitioner style). I have taken searuns at Agate Pass on my own olive version of the pattern. Tail: Olive Pheasant Rump tied as hackle and pulled back. Eyes: Black Mono tied in just ahead of Pheasant Rump. Body: Olive hares ear ribbed with gold wire. Hackle: 1 turn of Olive Pheasant Rump at front of hook. Wing: Olive Pheasant Rump laid flat along the hook shank (General Practitioner style).

Balser says to fish the pattern on a swing if the tide is moving and with sharp rythmic twitches if the current is flow. Good luck.
 

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Flaccid Member
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what do i know, im just a stupid kid

i never thought of sea runs as crab eaters. ive tried sand shrimp imitations that produced nothing even when feeding sea runs were visible. i havent had any sucess with anything other than baitfish imitations. on a different note, this year i vow to persue them with a dry fly. last season i did decent with a small bass popper (on my spinning rod---too windy) and would think i could do better with a bug rod. does anyone have any ideas on how to increase your hook up to dry fly strike ratio? they were knocking the plug all over the place but i could not hook up. i have talked to other fishermen who dismissed dry fly sea run fishing because they could not hook up. anyone have any experience? thanks.

~sean~
 

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I've skated a bomber or a stimulator for searuns. Know what you mean, however, about false hits. Steve Raymond in the book The Estuary Flyfisher says that dry flies are the most effective way to prospect for searuns.
 

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Hmmm-- don't know what to suggest, but I've had pretty good success with dries and searun. I would guess that my strike to hook ratio is about 70 percent on the average. It could be that I'm mostly skating the flies in current where the fish has to commit pretty firmly to make a showing. In calmer water, I've had a lot of refusals that I can see-- where the fish is attracted and rushes the fly but doesn't take.

I'm thinking of trying the Myawaki Beach Popper when I get back after the cutts as it has a stinger hook located in the tail.

One thing I think might improve the take ratio is a pattern change. I think pattern is important in getting firm takes, but that is only a hunch. I have had good luck skating a yellowjacket imitation in the fall, and that's why I'm thinking pattern might be more important than I give it credit at the moment.

This is an interesting topic-- especially with the lousy steelhead runs so far.
 

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what do i know, im just a stupid kid

some sort of stinger hook tied into the fly would probably be quite effective at getting these fish hooked on poppers and other foam bodied flies. although probably not effective on traditional dries like humpies and stimulators.

from years of bass fishing i have noticed that many bass come up and only touch the plug with its nose. i was curious by this behavior and i found out that fish have taste buds located on the outside of their mouths. this bumping of the lure is a means by which a bass feels out its prey if it is in the least bit uncertain. i wonder if the missed strikes by the sea runs are a more exuberant form of this tasting process. i also have noticed that sea run cutts are very competetive and maybe they are rushing their takes on the surface in order to compete with other cutts in the area. fish are so fascinating to me. i cant wait to get back at these magnificent fish!

~sean~
 
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About the Miyawaki Popper. I think it is misleading to refer to the "hook in the tail" as a stinger hook as it is the only hook on the pattern. Typically a stinger hook is a second hook or a trailing hook. Since we all release SRC's that we catch in the salt it is important that the imnitations we use have single barbless hooks. For info on tying this fly check the fly pattern section at www.waflyfishers.com. I'll get of the soapbox now.
 

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Stop Killing Wild Steelhead!
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As I understand it cutts feed on hatched crab in an immature state, I think it's the Megalops phase of the crap. They are almost invisible and seem like milky clouds in the water when you see them.The cutts just swim into them and suck them up. I am experimenting with some crab patterns that worked on weakfish beack east, snook and sea trout etc. So, we'll see. I have seen Jim Kerr make up some very tiny flies using gluegun glue and mono eyes. He's at Port Townsend Angler, check him out.
 
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