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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Was wondering if anyone up north has been there lately. I went to fish it about three weeks ago and and I thought the lake had turned to pea soup... I think it's a sleeper when it's fish-able. Any water reports would be appreciated so that a trip up there won't be a waste of time and gas.
 

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Flaccid Member
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3,899 Posts
i love fishing for browns in that pea soup. i think it makes them more aggressive to the fly. add a little more flash to your baitfish patterns than typical and strip the fly with a steadier cadence.
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
One in the same, Josh. I've never heard of anyone being so "optomistic" about fishing in that green slime. When I was there, the pea soup was mostly up against the bank carried there by the wind; a guy who was out in the middle advised that the water wasn't as gooey but still had alot of bloom in it. He wasn't having much luck though. Anyone else not bothered by the bloom being present? It has to affect the fish and their breathing...
 

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Switch Rod Samurai
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2,956 Posts
It does get a bit better.... a bit. Its usually a lt nicer early on in the year. You can actually see to the bottom in some of the shallower bays. I wonder if you can tie a sex dungeon with weed guards like a bass fly? That would be the ticket for the weeds and lumber.
 

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Flaccid Member
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the worse the bloom the better in my opinion. i dont believe the bloom is saturated throughout the water column. i think its contained in the top layer. either way it lowers visibility (a very good thing) and has led to some of my best days on the water with super aggressive browns (and bows) on the feed in the shallows.

browns have far superior vision and sensory feel than their prey particularly in low vis situations. the lower the light (early/late, cloud cover, pitch black or gnarly algae bloom) the more they have an advantage on their prey. they use this to their advantage by expending the most energy hunting in times where the scales are tipped in their favor.

the reason you havent heard of many people being so "optimistic" is because, generally, most fishermen adhere to what other fishermen tell them. and by how empty lakes are during an algae bloom in october i dont think there are many good fishermen to give the green light report. fishing streamers in the muck isn't traditonal and i dont think brian chan wrote a book about it. therefore it must suck!

what do i know tho??? i havent spent ungodly hours in the tube stripping flies around the logs day in and day out or anything. especially not for brown trout and particulary not in the fall algae bloom.
 

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Flaccid Member
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btw the big brown contest hasnt had an entry since spring.

im a little disappointed with WFF's performance. obviously Fenders is being nice and holding out the good fish porn. i should probably come out of stillwater retirement and show you guys how to stroke predatory brown trout.
 

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Switch Rod Samurai
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Im actually thinking of taking the 'toon out to cranberry soon, maybe even this weekend Im with you, Sean, he worse the vis, the better. Most of the big browns are nocturnal most the time. The algae helps the daytime bite in my opinion. I think that salamanders are a significant portion of these guys diet. Both in cranberry, and pass, and thats why I like a big intruder.
 

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pass was good on the 16th 2 large browns in one hour one was 20" and fat a real toad water was pea soup on far side from the road if you don't want browns don't fish in the soup more for us.
 
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