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I've tried lots of different waders including rubber waders, breathable waders, and 3 and 5 mil neoprene waders and while some are better than others they all have 1 thing in common...they leak and I'm getting tired or repairing them.

Most recently I bought some fancy Orvis waders thinking this might cure my problems and less than 1 season later they leak on the seams on the feet all the way around. I don't do bushwaking in waders and I don't consider myself hard on them but does this happen to everyone?

Anyone got any waders that don't leak that they like? I saw the Orvis "Bulletproof" waders and was thinking this might be my cure.

Any help would be great. Even a brand that guarantees them for a "few" years that I could just return when they go bad would be nice.
 

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What's the old quote... "Death, taxes and leaky waders?"

It's pretty much a fact of the fly fisherman's life. I've been lucky for the past couple of years, with a pair of breathables that have yet to spring a geyser. Knock on wood.

For a while there, I was blowing through a pair per season. (But then, I used to fish a couple hundred hours more per season than I do now.)

In any case, going with the Bulletproofs is probably not your solution. This type is made of a tougher outer material for resisting punctures. You're reporting seam leaks, which will happen no matter how tough the shell material is.

Orvis has a 4-year guarantee on their waders. Officially they say that the refund works like this: 100% within 1 year, 75% within 2 years, 50% within 3 years, 25% within 4 years. Unofficially, however, they will give you a full refund any time--if you ask for it in the right way.

I suggest taking them to the bank on this one.

Otherwise, you can discover the forgotten art of wader patching. I've seen articles on this that are fairly interesting. One technique involves filling them with air, submerging them in the bathtub and looking for where the bubbles come out to locate the leak.

There are numerous gore-tex patch kits available at fly shops and from the manufacturer.

For Neoprenes, I would recommend Aquaseal. This waterproof glue works very well. I've patched some gaping holes in my 3mm 'prenes with excellent results.

Fish On,
ww
 

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All the ones I have had leaked Except for one pair of bootfoot 4ml. I am going to try wearing a neoprine booty with my lite weights the leaks always seem to be near the leg to foot seam. Good luck and for helping me know that I am not the only leaky foot.
Fly rod Al :THUMBSUP
 

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Use a boat. One thing that helped me was only tubing when a boat launch was not possible. I used to tube a lot and found that it created seam leaks in my neoprenes in the crotch and legs. If you have the room to haul one, get a car topper. I purchased a used 8' Livingston for $250 and use it anywhere I can launch it. A 6' would be even easier for topping, but the 8' can squeeze two and I have a pickup. It's much warmer than tubing 8 months of the year and I can have the boat launched and fishing much faster than waders/boots/flippers/tube. Especially if you have stockingfoots...what a pain. Also, I love to fish a 2wt for the dinkers around here and I can cast and drift/troll much easier from the pram than a tube. There are times when a tube is the only way (Ebey comes to mind), but I think the $250 I paid for the boat has more than paid itself back in preserving my waders. Now, I can wade the 37 degree Sky and not have that cold "wake up" call in the crotch that I used to. If you have to tube, bootfoots are the only way to go. Toes are never cold, fingers never cold (from icey laces), no leaks in the heels or toes and nearly 15 minutes faster (on both suit up and suit down= 30 minutes more of fishing!) for me.
Just a thought.
 

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I bought the Simms guide-weight GoreTex waders (neoprene feet) last summer, and they've been great. They've kept me dry and, during the winter months, warm.

Do they leak? After hiking 4-6 miles of river several times, I found a few very minor leaks (probably from blackberry vines). What I like best about these waders is how easy it is to find and fix the leaks.

Just turn the waders inside out, spray with rubbing alcohol, and even the most insignificant leak shows as a black dot on a white background. Just touch it with drop of Aquaseal, wait a few hours and it's fixed.
 
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I've got a pair of Bare waders(light weight) not breathable that I've used for 5 yrs. They leaked in the foot part when I first got them but I put Aqua Seal on it and they haven't leaked since. I've never had my waders leak unless I have torn them. Jim S. :COOK
 

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I guess my only question would be is that do you wear something between your waders and your boots... I have always worn heavy socks for a cushion between them to guard against rub, or to keep a rock from working a hole in the waders. Also do you have gravel guards? My oldest son had a simular problem and what we found was that his boots were a little small and increasing one size cured the compression leaks he had. I have Simms Guide Weight Goretex waders and love them. I always rinse them , and really work on the neprene feet to make sure they dont have anything on them when I hang them to dry... Maybe this is all for nothing, but something I do just to help in my mind prevent something from happening. Maybe I'm just a little anal for doing this, but it works, and I'm not going to change. Its one of those good luck things we all have i guess....

Greg
 

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I too have the Simms guide weight breathables. Have had them for going on two years. I have hiked, bushwacked and kicked around in pontoon boats a fair amount with these waders with nary a leak (knock on wood). They are spendy, but my dad, who is one of the most tightfisted people I know, convinced me that waders are the one piece of equipment not to skimp on. I'm glad I paid attention to him.
 

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I have also had the Simms Guide Weight waders for two years now, and they have not leaked yet. I fish two to three times a week, and am not afraid to do my share of bushwacking to get to the good holes. These waders can take a tremendous amount of abuse. When mine finally wear out, I will buy a new pair the very next day.
Brad
 

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Fish till ya drop.
Then suck it up
and fish the evening hatch.

Damn rights all waders leak. Expensive ones leak just as fast as cheap ones. They make them that way so's you'll buy a new pair next season.
What I'd like to know is has anyone ever sealed up a leaky pair for long. I try each time, but never much luck getting it closed up for long.
Damn, we can send a man to the moon, but can't make a pair of decent waders!!!!!! :MAD
 

· Patrick
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I agree with using a boat rather then a float tube. I only use my waders on rivers and when it is still cold in upper mountain lakes. Instead of a row boat I use a kayak. This allows me to make very little noise and I often sneak up on wildlife. Well enough that one day a river otter decided the kayak was a log and started to climb up to have his fish lunch. The only time the kayak has given me trouble is when the wind gets heavy it blows me quickly across the lake. I have since made an anchor to fix this problem. The kayak also can be hiked in to lakes like you can tubes. When I want to troll a fly I bought a rod holder made for kayaks sold in the Cabela's catolog for about $20. I also use the kayak to flyfish for bass in very shallow water. I have had fish right next to the boat in less the 1 foot of water when back in the deep lily pads without spooking them as long as my shadow does not go over them. The kayak I use cost around $350 new but you can find, if you look a used one for much less. Mine was a used one and it has gotten alot of use since I got it.
 

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I love my G3's. Eventually mother nature wins. Water will find a way into your waders through regular use, abuse by rocks, pulling and brush or you'll slip and no amount of waterproof breathable material will keep water out of that big hole that your body sticks out of. My G3's are so much more substantial than other offerings I've tried. It makes for a warmer summer trip, but the pros are so much more than the cons. I'm sure there are other great waders. I used some Orvis and Redingtons for years before the Simms, all served me well but the G3's are the best I've had.
 

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Sorry, spending $400.00 isn't going to keep you dryer longer.My waders cost $80 bucks,that means I can buy 5 pairs for the cost of one simms.Oh yeah,these waders have lasted 5 yrs.(just recently started seeping).So, 5 yrs.per wader at $80 means your Simms better last 25 years,....haha good luck with that one suckers.No offense intended,just my two-cents.Hem
 
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