Washington Fly Fishing Forum banner
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
227 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been perusing through my latest issue of Fly Tier magazine, looking at the ads for an upgrade on a new vise (if anyone wants to put in their two cents worth, go ahead). Anyway, I was looking at some small midge patterns, and a thought occured to me which I imagine many of you might also have had: do trout see the hook as well as the fly, and if so, does it affect their decision to strike? I'm sure that on larger flies, say #8 and up, the bend and point get lost in the details, but on much smaller flies, the exposed hook is rather prominent. I would think that the silhouette of a #18 midge pupae looks kind of suspicious to a trout with that unnatural curved tail hanging down under it. It would be great if someone could develop a clear hook material; then this thread would be moot. I await comments from flyberspace.

Hapiness is a tight line.
Aaron J
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,938 Posts
Not a dumb question at all. All the research I've looked at says that trout (and other fish as well) will look at positives, not negatives when trying to determine if something is food. A trout's brain asks "does it have legs?" not "does it have six legs?" for instance. Actually it doesn't ask anything, it just looks for legs :CLOWN That's why a soft hackle with 36 barbules swinging around doesn't bother the fish even though it's six times the normal amount of legs! Things like too many legs, not matching the color, hooks, etc. would be a negative screening device, and would take too long, and also keep fish from trying other foods, which could impact survival. For instance polution and warming water due to development decimating a stonefly population, while attracting certain caddis. If the trout started screening out things that "weren't stoneflies" they would starve. This is a very simple explanation of a very complex set of behaviors, so it's easily open to someone arguing against it. So please, cut me some slack, I know there are exception and outside pressures and conditioning can alter this... :LOVEIT
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
227 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks, Philster, for your explanation. We must remind ourselves not to anthropomorphize onto our scaly friends the imperfect human logic with which we are resigned to view the world around us. A trout's only drives are survival and reproduction, and rarely has to decide on which brand of beer to buy or whether to use a sinking line. The glass really is half full!
 

·
AKA: Gregory Mine
Joined
·
998 Posts
Regal Master with the bronze base.I have two of these and love them. Look into the midge jaws for them, they really make smaller flies easier to tie. But, if you can afford it, Renzetti Master. Used one a couple times, and wow......
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
227 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks, Yakima. I also saw a Maryatt MP vise that looks great-true rotary, mucho versatility, but I haven't found a price for it yet. I'm still tying on my first cheapo vise with no bobbin rest and no rotary capability. I can put out decent flies (at least the fish think so), but it's like tying with one hand at times.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top