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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Was at a lake in Eastern Wash. yesterday and being not to experienced in fly fishing and even way less experienced in lake fly fishing, a buddy and I found out on this particular lake that fishing an emerger pattern was the ticket. We fished most of the day trolling wolley buggers and my friend caught a 19 incher right off the bat, and I caught an identical fish an hour later with a stonefly nymph. Then nothing...until we figured out how to fish this emerger pattern. Now, I don't know how to are suppose to fish it, but all I was doing is casting it out and doing some small strips in and I couldn't keep fish off the line. I caught 12 in an hour and a half including a 20 inch rainbow!! BTW the fly I was using was completely destroyed after the 3rd fish and it looked almost nothing like it did when it was new and it still was hammering fish in this lake!

So this might be a dumb question but how are you actually suppose to fish an emerger in stillwater?
 

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Emergers are usually fished sitting in the lens of the water surface tension (meniscus). However, the way you fished your pattern, it must have appeared like a chironomid attempting to fly off but crippled by a clinging shuck. Stick that in your pipe and smoke it.

--Dave E.
 

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As Ceviche notes, many emerger patterns are fished in or on the surface. Whether you'd call this dry fly fishing or not is a moot point depending, I suppose, on what you call the pattern. Here are a few of my favorite floating emerger patterns: a simple midge emerger, the Chopaka Emerger (a Callibaetis mayfly emerger) and a pattern I've been working on which I call an inverted midge emerger.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
The one I was using I was called a caddis emerger and it looked like a little poof of antron and a short tail with some peacock hackle at the head. After the third fish, the poof part actually came undone and it made it look like it had a lot longer tail(or possibly shuck) and I caught another eight or so fish with it including that one in the pic. I am tempted to tie up some that look like the damaged fly to see if that would actually work. I will try to get a pic of it. I like the looks of those patterns though, Preston and will have to try my hand at those. Could you possible list the materials or steps on how to tie those?

Thanks!
 

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Preston, well done on the inverted pattern. I've been trying to come up w something similar, but cant get it to ride like that. Does it seem to hold in that position during the retrieve? Looks like it would be a killer pattern.
 

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sometimes its not a match the hatch game either. it might be one thing about the fly they like such as size, flash, color, movement, and depth. you might have been fishing an "emerger" but it might just be that the fish were holding in 1-3 feet of wwater depth and. or the trolling speed was too fast of the wolley bugger.
 

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Midge Emerger
Hook: Tiemco 206BL, 16-20
Thread: 8/0 black
Trailing shuck: Zelon or sparkle yarn fibers
Abdomen: Tying thread
Thorax and wing: Coastal deer hair
Tie in the deer hair as a hair down-wing then pull it forward and tie down behind the hook eye, leaving the tips projecting up and out.

Chopaka Emerger
Hook: Any size 14-16 standard dry fly hook
Trialing shuck: Tan Zelon or sparkle yarn fibers
Abdomen: Nature's Spirit Callibaetis dubbing
Thorax and wing: Coastal deer hair
Tie in thorax and wing in the same manner as the midge pattern above.

Inverted midge emerger
Tiemco 206BL, 16-18
Thread: 8/0, color to match (black, brown, red, olive, gray) midge.
Front gills: Rainy's 1/16 inch diameter foam wing post material
Thorax/wing case: Thin strip of black closed-cell foam, tied in between the front gills, wrapped back then pulled forward and tied down.
Abdomen: Tying thread
Anal gills: White polypropylene yarn.

Hope this helps.
 

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Preston, as always you are a tying artist and great resource for those of us with so much to learn. Thanks for sharing those patterns.
 
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