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Hi all, I have a couple posts but have never introduced myself...so here goes :)
I am 36, live in Everett, WA. and up until a week ago had never tried fly fishing on the water. I was given all my friends grandpa's fishing gear, and included in it were 2 fly rods (a nice 2 piece, and an older 5 piece pack rod), a nice assortment of flies, and one 1963 self winding fly reel, as well as many other types of rods and gear. Since I showed an interest in learning it I have been given 2 float tubes, loaned a net, loaned a snug pair of chest waders (no boots though), loaned a reel with sinking line loaded on it, given another mess of flies in a nice travel box, bought a new reel and spooled it up with a floating line that I was given. I have a nice vest I that was a christmas present last year, and Sunday was given a pair of hip wader boots.

I have been practicing for about 3.5 weeks almost daily with my sinking line setup between both poles, and getting a good feel for it with some nice 24-25 ft casts. Sunday I was going to get out and float tube blackman's lake in Snohomish...but was unable to find a set of fins I could afford. I decided to go anyway , and fished from the dock. I was out for a couple hours casting and stripping line without a bite. Roll casting was a new experience, and sinking line handles way differently when actually on water ;) Now I have started to practice with my floating line setup, and it is kind of a pain...my technique needs to be better then it is with the sinking line I am finding floating line is not as forgiving to casting mistakes. I have been getting some nice back and false casts going on, but then when I go to cast I loose it and wind up with a pile of line 8-10 ft from me . After analyzing my cast technique I believe I am not coming forward to a stop then laying the tip down. I am coming forward without a stop and laying the tip down, which kills the energy in the line...and causing it to fall into a pile. I won't be able to practice and work this out to see if I am right until later tonight but I will let you know how it goes :thumb:

Regards,

Will R. Everett, WA.
 

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Hmmmm you sound alot like me. I too just picked up the fly rod and am in the learning curve. Take a lesson or two. I did and still haven't got it completely figured out. I have been told practice, practice practice. I try to practice at least 3 times a week. Sometimes not able.

I find floating line easier to toss then sinking tip.
 

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Just an Old Man
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In no time at all you will be winging line out there like an old pro. These are called growing pains or casting pains. We all went through them. It all takes time in getting the rhythm down. Next thing you know, you might even catch fish.
 

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Welcome Will, tons of information to read and learn from in the pages of WFF. Countless members here, probably some within spitting distance of your own home, that will eagerly share time to get you on the road to successful fly fishing. Find a local fly shop, find a local club. Both are likely filled with more folks that will have things to offer as you grow.
 

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I hope she likes whitefish
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The Creek company makes good/inexpensive fins (35$?). The casting just takes practice. Once you get the feel it will be like riding a bike. It sounds like you are pretty dedicated to learning about this stuff so you will be there in no time. It definitely helps A LOT to go fishing with people who know what they are doing. I'm very grateful to those that helped me when I first started out. Since then I have taken (taught?) several people to fly fish and I always think of those who helped me.

Tony
 

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Craigslist is a good source for cheap or sometimes even free fins man. Look for used diving gear. I ditched the expensive made for float tube ones years ago. The dive fins have way more "bite". don't take that as "go get a cheap pair of snorkel fins from walmart. Find a nice set made for pro saltwater diving.

If you can't cast yet, a float tube is the way to go. Check out washingtonlakes.com. There are a helluva lot of better lakes in the area than blackmans. And don't practice casting on the lawn like a lot of people reccommend. Do it on the water. :thumb: Fish don't live on grass. I've caught some damn nice fish on a 10 foot tangled around my neck, arms, a tree and legs cast. :rofl:
 

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Will, you may get near a fly shop when going to and from work or that type of trip around if not there is a shop in Monroe I would reccomend also in Issaquah and Mill city and others lisited under contents in the front of this forum. Also you could catch Leland at Orvis in Bellvue He is very good or Derek also at Orvis. Take your rods reels and lines to the shop with you and have them make sure they match up correctly. Find a shop you can deal with easily and that you like the people so you will go back when the need arises. You won't go back if you weren't satisfied before and it's not convienent. Then they may even help you get togeather with some one to go with. All the advise above is good but be sure you are working with equipment that goes togeather well. Good luck and welcome to the group.
 

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Welcome aboard Will! It sounds like you are off to a great start. Having the desire and patience to learn is half the battle IMO. From reading your post it seems like you already have a decent understanding of the mechanics of the cast, and that is great. Coming to a nice firm stop on the forward cast is something I struggled with for a long time, and is something that still rears its ugly head from time to time. Keep at it, and it will come. A lesson or two is certainly a fine idea. Also, it may be worth noting what weight rods you were given and what lines you have. Having the right line for your rod will make all the difference in the world.

As for fins, I'm thinking I may have an extra pair I could let you have. I'm not 100% certain, but I believe I do. A couple years ago I thought I had lost my fins, so I bought replacement ones, only to discover that I had not lost my original fins after all. I'll take a look tonight and see if they are in anywhere to be found, and if they are, you are welcome to have them. Just shoot me a PM if you're interested.

You've come to a great resource, be sure to use it extensively.

Nick
 

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Not knowing what kind of rod you are starting out with as a preface, for most rods you won't be able at first to feel a rod load with much less than 40 feet of line. Load being the line pulling on the rod. In fact it is probably more difficult to cast 25 feet than 40 feet at first.

The key to casting is learning to recognize the feel of load by the line on the rod. Watch your back cast and when the line is straight then excellerate your foreward stroke to a complete stop at 10 o'clock and don't drop your rod tip if you intend to make another backcast. At first stop your backcast stroke at 1 o'clock. Later if you decide to shoot for distance you will be dropping your rod parallel to the ground on the backcast and shooting line on the backcast. Excellerate your foreward cast to a stop and excellerate your backcast to a stop. Give the line time to load the rod. Some rods like a slower excelleration and some like it faster. It depends on how deep into the rod a load is carried. That is pretty vague I know but you have to play with speed of presentation.

Dave
 
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