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It actually looks like its a hybrid golden bow. Someone correct me if I'm wrong but it has the larger spots that appear in a rod on the side of a golden trout with a red slash going through all of them. Where did you get him at?
 

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FUBAR
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Those are parr marks and are found on Rainbow Trout when they are young. Buck I could be wrong but it looks like any one of 100's of young Rainbow Trout I have seen out of back country water.
 

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Hot Carl
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To avoid future confusion regarding your thread title:

Either "Fish I.D." or "Fish ID" would work. "I'D" is a contraction for "I would." So, many read your thread title and think that the thread they're about to read is a list of fish you'd like to pleasure.
 

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"Ride'n Dirty."
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Lol, auto spell checker. I'd please a lot more if they just told me how too!
 

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"Ride'n Dirty."
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
So I checked this pic with the pics of the fish I caught up at icicle creek and this one is definitely more spotted bit not so different. Sure was a pretty fish.
Thanks for the help,
Frank.
 

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Parr marks occur not only on rainbow trout but on all immature salmonids (with the exception of pink salmon). The marks commonly disappear as part of the process of maturation. All anadromous salmonids lose their parr marks during the process of smoltification when they take on an overall silvery appearance as their bodies undergo the physical changes which will allow them to survive in a salt (as opposed to fresh) water environment. The term was originally applied to young Atlantic salmon and was extended to all salmonid species. People often erroneously refer to catching smolts when in fact they are catching parr. Smolt only refers to that stage of development when the parr marks have disappeared as the downstream migration begins.
 

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"Ride'n Dirty."
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
So I caught a parr. An Immature salmonoid that hasn't (but will) go to sea?
 

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I am pretty sure all immature rainbows have parr marks, whether the are sea run or not.
 

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No, all immature salmonids have parr marks. Anadromous salmonids lose theirs when they smolt, resident salmonids lose theirs as a part of a gradual aging and maturing process. Trout in cold, relatively food-poor environments seem to retain their parr marks most of their lives.
 

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FUBAR
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He did not say "ONLY" Rainbow Trout he was speaking to sea run vs. non sea run but you go ahead and be right just the same.
 

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Young parr-stage 'Bow . . . likely lived in shaded water. Used to catch Cutts years ago in a stretch of crick (sorry, Montanan . . . have no clue what a "creek" is . . . ) covered/shaded by old-growth timber . . . bed was lined with dark-green moss . . . Cutts were damn-near black. And they had lots of spots. No sun to fade them out.
 
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