Washington Fly Fishing Forum banner
  • Please post in our Community Feedback thread for help with the new forum software! If you are having trouble logging in, please Contact Us for assistance. 

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
member
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 5 wt rod & a 5 wt reel with a spare spool. I'm fairly new to the sport. I would like to know what kind of 5 wt line to put on. Do I need a full float or full sink or a sink tip WF or DT? Any recommendations would be very helpful.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
658 Posts
I agree, start with a weight forward floating line. That'll cover you for dries, nymphs, and a lot of streamer fishing as well. Since you've got an extra spool, maybe you want to put a type III full sink on it, assuming you're going to invest in a float tube and get yourself out on some lakes as well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,342 Posts
I made it through all my High School & College years fishing a 5wt WF Floating, and a Type 6 Sink Tip. Fished lakes, rivers, streams, and salt beaches. The only difficult times was when the limited depth of my sink tip could not reach the fish holding in deeper water. That is one advantage of the full sink lines in lakes. If you go with a type III full sink as Calvin has suggested you can fish any depth you like. Simply control your depth by how long you let it sit and how fast you retrieve or row. - My 2cents anyway.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,215 Posts
What rod and what are you fishing for. If you are fishing a fast action rod or slower will make a difference. some of the fast action rods load better with lines that are a 1/2 size bigger or a full size bigger. are you fishing big water or smaller streams? Dry flies or nymphs and streamers? All will make a difference. I recently did purchase new lines for my 4 and 6 wt's. Did a lot of research and settled on Rio gold. I had problems mending and line control with my last couple of lines. The had shorter heads and a thinner running line. The Rio gold cast well and has much better line control (mending) because of the longer head. So I would suggest a longer head WF or DT line.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,711 Posts
Paul if you're going to fish lakes make sure you have a clear intermediate line in your arsenal. You'll catch more fish with that line in stillwaters than any other line.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,801 Posts
I agree, start with a weight forward floating line. That'll cover you for dries, nymphs, and a lot of streamer fishing as well. Since you've got an extra spool, maybe you want to put a type III full sink on it, assuming you're going to invest in a float tube and get yourself out on some lakes as well.
Substantially agree, with the exception of the Type 3 full sink. A floating line should be the first line you own; it will be the most used. The second line, in my opinion, should be a sink tip, type 3. Dave Hughes recommends this sequence/combo, as well. You can cover a lot of fishing conditions with these two lines . . .
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top