Washington Fly Fishing Forum banner
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
353 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I bought a 5 weight forward floating line a few years ago at reduced price and was considering using it now because my current line is sinking. The color of the new line is bright orange. I will be using it to dry fly and nymph fish in rivers. I was wondering whether the line color bright orange is likely to spook more fish than tan or green? If so, what line color (other than the new clear ones) do people prefer?

Thanks
mike
 
G

·
I like mint or pink.

3M makes a sunrise (orange) that I tried and did pretty well with in lakes so I tried it in streams. I didn't notice any difference in my catch but, boy is it easy on the eyes. I nymph w/o indicators so I really rely on my line and the sunrise is the best. If you watch the 3M video tapes you'll see Doug Swisher take some HUGE trout with an Orange floating line. Orvis has a nice mint color that I would say is my favorite for lakes though.:thumb
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
184 Posts
In his insightful work, The Dry Fly (1990), Gary LaFontaine discusses the importance of stealth while stalking trout. Although he stresses the importance of wearing drab clothing and removing reflective material from equipment and clothing prior to fishing (he suggests dulling the glare on a newly purchased rod with steel wool...right in the shop, just for kicks), he does not comment on brightly colored fly lines as a fish deterrent. I find this a bit puzzling, since a good portion of his treatise on fly design is devoted to color and the way it interacts with various light conditions. But given Gary's thoughtful consideration of the topic, I don't think that his failure to address line color was an oversight.

In the same book, Gary emphasizes the significance of line handling and control to successfully catching wary trout. This brings me to the light blue Monic Skyline, which is marketed as a line that reduces shadows while false-casting. I found that, although this line may have been more stealthy, it had inferior line handling properties. Not only did I have trouble seeing the line on bright days, but the memory problems created by it's "unique" design made casting and mending difficult. Any stealth that I gained was more than offset by the poor performance in line control. It's worth noting that I have also had trouble seeing the Wulff ivory Triangle Taper line on bright days. I love the way it casts and mends, but if you can't see it...you don't have control.

Anyway, there are a few things to consider. I will not step down off my soap box.

-Crock
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,938 Posts
All floating lines float in the "film" or meniscus, not on "top" of the water. Put on a diving mask and look up at a bunch of different floating lines. They ALL pretty much look dark grey to black on the water due to the light "bending" around the line... In the air, a light line should be less visible against the sky than a dark or very bright unnaturally colored one, and maybe they are, but the fish don't really seem to care unless you cast right over the top of them... "Right over the top of them" is a flexible measure that depends on a lot of factors, like pressure, water depth, clarity, etc. Apparently something being visible, and something being considered a threat are two different things to the incredibly simple reactive organ a trout brain is. I had one client who came in one day with video from a trip to New Zealand. He kept saying "you gotta have a grey line there, nothing else works" As I'm watching the video he is stealthily (sp) moving up on a trout and casting his grey line at his guides direction, and hooking a steelhead sized trout, while no more than 70 feet behind him, on a rise, clearly visible in the trout's window is an orange, red and white helicopter sitting there with the blades truning :rofl

A good approach is all you need. Bright lines make your life easier.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,860 Posts
Speaking of lines, I'm thinking about ponying up the money for a new clear line. Seems to me that if a clear line allows some light to pass through the line, the silhouette would be reduced as far as the fish goes. Such reduced visabilty would seem to be very important. Does anyone have any comment or experience here?
BOBLAWLESS:thumb
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
51 Posts
I have a couple different clear lines. 1. The camo line from cortland and 2. the Stillwater line from SA. In my mind, the Stillwater line is the better of the two; less memory, less tangles and a little easier to cast. The clear line is my first choice for lake fishing. The only downside to the Stillwater is that it will develop a belly, unlike the Uniform sink series which remains nice and straight in the water to ensure secure hook-ups. As far as catching fish, the clear lines are probably more for the angler's confidence than anything else. Prior to my clear line days I was catching fish down deep with a weighted floating line. If you need more info just let me know.:professor

-Adam
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,938 Posts
Ironically, I think they do more harm than good... They tend to be a little chubbier (more cash= more splash?) than a comparable opaque line and cast a HUGE shadow underwater. Plus, I have horrible shoulders, both sides, and while I can cast well at most ranges, and better than most into obstructions, it isn't automatic. Every stroke has to be thought about and midstroke corrections happen all the time. I count on my line to tell me my casting stroke isn't working, and there are some conditions where I can't see the clear line (DUH!) in the air. I'm a better caster with the cheap light blue cortland intermediate than I am with expensive clear intermediates. Better casting = more fish for me... They are not a "ninety foot leader" as some who have a need to sell lines often say.
 

·
Mother Nature's Son
Joined
·
1,347 Posts
One line that I have had great success with is the Rio Versi-tip line system. It comes with multiple heads which allow one to fish a wide variety of fishing situations without having to carry more than a wallet containing the various pieces. In particular, it comes with an intermediate tip that is clear. In many fishing situations, I've definitely outfished others by using this line and I attribute that largely to the clear head which I believe minimizes spooking the fish. The tip is 15 feet in length and from there I attach a butt section of about 1 foot and then a leader of about 9-12 feet and then tippet material. All said, that give about 25 feet or so of line that is less noticeable to the fish. The running line that it attaches to is brigh yellow and is very easily seen. I believe the Versi-Tip system is built from rod weights of 6 on up.

Skinny
 

·
Just an Old Man
Joined
·
35,207 Posts
The thrill is not in the kill---But to let them go.

I also have the Versitip and what I like to do is use the floating head with one of those sinking leaders. I get good distance with that setup. The reasoning for that way is that I have a little trouble getting the type 6 sinking head out of the water. It is very sticky. 8 ft is eaisier to get out than 15 ft. And it still seems to get down,but not in real fast water. But there seems to be no fish in the fast stuff.

Jim
 

·
Stop Killing Wild Steelhead!
Joined
·
5,673 Posts
For allot of years, and I mean allot, I used an old cortland ivory double taper floating line in the trout streams of new york and new england. It never seemed to bother the fish.It was pretty bright up there in the air and the sunlight too. I think the greatest handicap in bright colored lines, for dry fly fishing, is in the air, the bright reflection of color and light over the water. Thats where a drab colored line may help. And in lake and stillwater fishing drab or clear lines are preferable for their camouflage efect.I bet a clear line flashes pretty bright in the sunny sky when you are casting as well, especially when it's wet. Stealth is really the first consideration, then color of line.Some of the toughest trout to catch are up on the deleware river's west branch, where fly anglers are pounding the water with match the hatch patterns all season long. Very educated trout. I have used an "emergency orange" colored SA line up there with very good catch rate results. This is a great color if you are getting blind, old or bored. And you can hang it out your car window if you have a breakdown on the highway!
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top