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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been rooting around to see what lines are better for casting chironomids/bobber rigs set to say 25 -28' from a Watermaster and haven't found much. I currently fish a 5 wt 10' rod and can easily handle up to 20' leaders, I use a WF 6 wt line to aerialise/lob this and it works well. I also fish a 4 wt 9 ft rod with a 4wt line and anything over 15' is a pain.

This season I'm thinking of heading to BC and to other new lakes and so I'd like to fish deeper but haven't tried it as the lake I usually fish, Lone, doesn't get much deeper. Beyond 28' - 30' I'd just go type 6 and straight down. I've just bought an 11 ft 3-4 wt and I'm thinking the extra length and overlining will help haul a lot of line from the depths, allied with a slow 'lazy' casting style to avoid tight loops and think more lobs to first get really long leaders aerial and then back out there. Poorer leverage on a good fish with a n11' rod will be interesting but for now I'm just trying to figure out what is a workable set up to get my flies in the zone. I'm a failry proficient caster but this will be a different style I need to practice/learn.

Anyone's thoughts, suggestions or experiences are greatly appreciated.

Dave
 

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Agreed regarding fishing from a boat where I can stand versus fishing from a position closer to the water. When I really wanted to fish an indicator that deep out of my tube I generally would just sorta flop the leader and flies out where I want it then kick away and let it sink. Not pretty but effective.

I always liked the Rio Indicator lines for my long leader work. Up sized a line or two I was able to get those long leaders off the water and cast back out without too much struggle.

Honestly Ira's switch rod is probably the most effective tool I've seen for this application and if I was still fishing lakes on a regular basis Id probably own one or two myself.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks guys,

yeah the lack of standing definitely limits casting but I've a good reach being quite tall and was wondering re the 11' giving me that wee bit more with an overloaded line or two and a slow stroke. I appreciate Nick's comments re a paddling cast but don't really want to f about paddling if anchored.

But, then again maybe I could, I don't want to appear an ungrateful ass here. I'd asked for thoughts and got some good ones right away, so thank you both.

Cheers,

Dave
 

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Indi Ira
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It really sounds to me like you are well ahead of the game in your understanding of what it means to cast a long leader with an indicator. Understanding that you need to slow down your stroke to keep the loops wide is key.

I like the Rio Indicator lines, but my sharkskin does as well honestly. I'm a boat guy so any advice I would give will be limited.
 

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AKA: Gregory Mine
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Use the wind. Anchor nose into the wind and throw 90 degrees to it. I've gone up to 28' leaders with a 5wt. Your shoulder after a week tells you enough is enough, but use the breeze/wind as your friend. The old timers would cast short and let the wind drift the line out tight then work it back in. If you're in a dead calm day, you're doomed to get any distance at all.

In BC I never used an indicator in water deeper than 12 feet (Sheridan). They hardly ever hit light, usually they are out of the water and your rod with a deep bend in it before your brain can even register what's going on. Hang on and have a blast.
 

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Indi Ira
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Use the wind. Anchor nose into the wind and throw 90 degrees to it. I've gone up to 28' leaders with a 5wt. Your shoulder after a week tells you enough is enough, but use the breeze/wind as your friend. The old timers would cast short and let the wind drift the line out tight then work it back in. If you're in a dead calm day, you're doomed to get any distance at all.

In BC I never used an indicator in water deeper than 12 feet (Sheridan). They hardly ever hit light, usually they are out of the water and your rod with a deep bend in it before your brain can even register what's going on. Hang on and have a blast.
I did have some light bites at Sheridan, but yes some of those takes were down right wicked.
 

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AKA: Gregory Mine
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I did have some light bites at Sheridan, but yes some of those takes were down right wicked.
Contrary to those normal take downs, the biggest fish I ever hooked at Sheridan the rod tip just slowly started going down. Just a few inches like a slow snag. I tightened up a little hoping to feel something, and it just kept swimming. Never panicked, just swam away. I set hard then all hell broke loose. Saw the tail once and my jaw dropped open. Then the humiliating reel of shame as it came unbuttoned about 75 yards away. Fifteen minutes later the same thing happened. I went in for an early lunch after that.
 

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Indi Ira
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Contrary to those normal take downs, the biggest fish I ever hooked at Sheridan the rod tip just slowly started going down. Just a few inches like a slow snag. I tightened up a little hoping to feel something, and it just kept swimming. Never panicked, just swam away. I set hard then all hell broke loose. Saw the tail once and my jaw dropped open. Then the humiliating reel of shame as it came unbuttoned about 75 yards away. Fifteen minutes later the same thing happened. I went in for an early lunch after that.
My first fish at Sheridan was 26". After all the hype and seeing the pictures up at the place I was staying, I assumed that it wouldn't be much to talk about. It ended up being the heaviest fish of the trip. And that fish did take with serious abandon.
 

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AKA: Gregory Mine
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My first fish at Sheridan was 26". After all the hype and seeing the pictures up at the place I was staying, I assumed that it wouldn't be much to talk about. It ended up being the heaviest fish of the trip. And that fish did take with serious abandon.
Mind you, I haven't been to Sheridan since we moved to Las Vegas. However I had been going there almost yearly since my Parents started going there when I was about 10 or so. Right after it opened back up after the cleansing of the lake from trash fish. That is where I learned to throw flies. My dad was drifting Horse Hairs and I saw a man throwing flies catching a lot more than we were, so I asked my dad what he was doing, and luckily he knew the man and before I knew it I ended up in his boat being taught what he was doing, and had a blast. I was gut hooked at that point and never looked back. He became one of my closest friends, and was overcome by his passing a few years back. A lot of the old timers are gone now, and those close friendships I had with them could never be replaced.

As I'm sure you know, Sheridan can be as fickle as a bitch if you don't know what you're doing. However if you can dial it in ,get to know the people in camp, it can be some of the best fishing you could ever have. 5 pound fish don't even raise an eyebrow. At 7 pounds you may get a nod. Hit 10 pounds, you might have a small following.
 
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