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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have only been fly fishing for a couple of months now and i want to start tying my own flies. I have been looking at different kits but i wanted your opnions on what a good tying kit need to contain. I also want to know if it is worth it to spend the extra money on a rotary vise. Thanks for your help.

Ryan
 

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Formerly Tight Loops
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Don't buy a premade kit, in general they are not built to tie flies, they are built to make money from folks wanting to learn to tie flies.

I would first advise taking a class, and buying the materials that they recommend rather than trying to learn yourself.

If you seriously want to go your own way, buy a vise, and rotary is unimportant for a beginnner. Get a bobbin, some 6/0 black thread, and the materials to make a carey special, and a wooley bugger. then find a book that will take you though all the steps.

There are good websites for a beginners: http://www.keeptying.com/; http://www.tie1on.net/.
---------
Genetic pollution damages wild
stocks, bonk those Hatchery Zombies!
 

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"TomK"
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I started with a pre-made kit from Kaufmann's. Their recommendation at the store was to start with the nymph kit (and their book, of course!..). The book was great. It gave me the basic skills to tie just about anything. The book starts off doing simple flies then builds up to stuff that's more complicated. The kit had almost everything I needed in it so I was able to tie about a dozen different nymph patterns without having to buy anything else. Moving on to dries was a piece of cake. But, it's also true what was said about them just trying to sell the kits -- there are some things in the kit that I haven't used even 2 years after buying it.....If you go to a reputable shop they should be able to get you what you need without selling you stuff you'll probably never use.
 

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Just an Old Man
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35,203 Posts
What do I know---I'm just an old man

Not to rain on your parade but this very subject was covered about a month ago and if you did a search on this site you would come up with some very good answers. Just my .04 cents worth.

Jim
 

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The only thing I dont like about the kits is the vise. They will give you enough materials to learn some techniques but the vise should be the first thing to go. I started with one of these kits a few years ago, and I wish I had a better vise, I'm still stuck with it today but don't have the sence tobuy a new vise instead of a new rod. Guess I should take a look at my priorities? No, I think there in the right order. :DUNNO
 
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The Cabela's premium fly-tying kit is actually pretty decent. If I was a raw beginner I wouldn't be too embarassed to recieve one as a gift just to get me going in the right direction. Many of the cheaper kits are just trash, seemingly filled with the left over stuff you would never want in the first place. Better yet would be if you had someone to mentor you and actually take you to a fly shop and help you make decisions based on what you want to tie and what your budget is. Long term it won't be much cheaper than buying flies but a lot more satisfying. Enjoy, Ive
 

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Slainte
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I also want to know if it is worth it to spend the extra money on a rotary vise. Thanks for your help.
Ryan
Yup, it's worth it, caution is for kids at a crosswalk going to school.

You're fly fishing and if you don't have a Jones (bad habit) for it yet, you ain't gonna. If you do, buy the most versatile vice you can, my suggestion, Renzetti traveler.

I can spin the head and see the whole fly at any time, nothing worse than tying a lopsided fly.

Don't be afraid to shop around for a good price, check e-Bay, etc.
 

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Formerly tbc1415
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3,174 Posts
I have to disagree with the choice of a rotary vice for a beginners kit. This is based on the assumption that the begining tier basically wants a serviceable set of tools to get started.
I definitely do not disagree with the advantages of a rotary vice. Just the cost factor. I think the beginning tier has his hands full with mastering basic technique, good material choices, etc. As the tiers skill level advances he/she may reach a point where a rotary vice makes more sense. There is so much to learn that a tier can get along with a good old Thompson AA basic hook holder for many years.
Ive been tying for over twenty years and I still don't have a rotary. Although it's been on my christmas list for five years now. I have spent ten times the cost of a rotary on materials and tools not to mention books. A basic kit from Cabellas and a few good books or just one great book like the new Benchside Reference from Leeson/Schollmeyer, should hold the new tier for at least a few years.

Maybe this year Santa will hear my plea.
 

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Right now, and I mean RIGHT NOW! check out [www.flytiers.com]. They're having some serious sales on fly tying stuff--vises included. I thought I saw some very nice rotaries for under $100. For all the rest of you, there's plenty of other things to make you budget anglers drool. Have fun!
 

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Fifty seven year ago, a got a funky little fly tying kit whose main virtue was the fact that it was cheep. It had a Thompson "A" model vise and a bunch of junk. The vise was adequate, although I gave it up for a new Renzetti Traveller, a few years ago. The price here is about ten times what it cost to make but then what isn't? I do love my Renzetti if for no other reason than it makes me sort of big time.
All of the above posts show experience and knowlege, though I don't agree with everything. Be careful about begining a hobby like fly tying. It is very addictive, worse that heroin, or crack or smokes, women etc. You can stop now; later it will be too late. I should go to rehab, but I'm unwilling to jump up and shout to everyone, "I'm
just a SOBBO MOTHERENO FLY TYER, AND I'M SO SORRY!" :TSKTSK
 

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I have the extra-cheap ($20 I think it was) Cabella's kit. The quality seems to be lacking, but it does the job. Granted, the vice doesn't rotate, but it does hold the hook tightly. The bobbin does its job and so do the other tools. I think that if you're just going to try out fly tying, it's OK to get a cheap kit. Good equipment might make it a bit easier, but like casting, most of fly tying success seems to be based on the tyer's skill and practice. I'm sure the good tyers on this board could make perfect flies with my little kit.

I'll qualify this by saying that I don't tie much -- I purchase most of them because I don't have time to tie. If I do have spare time, I try to spend it fishing.
 

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Stop Killing Wild Steelhead!
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If I had it to do again, I would be grateful for so much good advice as you have gotten here. Take some classes from a good tier at a group or club- it should be cheap or free. Try out tools etc and get the minimum very good quality items you need. Build it all up slowly. I like the Regal Rotary vice. I have a renzetti and I love it- but the regal rotary is just as good and I would prefer it.Much cheaper too.
 

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I definatly agree about the regal rotary vise and the advice to buy the best you can and build up slowly. I've had my regal for about 18 years and of all the stuff you end up with it has caused me the least grief if you can,t go rotary still grt the basic not having to deal with adjusting the tension in the jaws get you going and once those hooks are in they stay in. Heck I've bent hooks spiinnig deer hair before Whenever I teach kids or anyone to tie they should start with easy patterns that catch fish woolley buggers chenille bodied flys since winters here tie lots of chenille bodied maribou winged or palmered flies in the largest size you can cast without taking your head off rotating hackle pliers are also worth the money for me the hardest tool to keep just right are the sisccors wore out my favorites last year and just can't seem to find the right ones now very frustrating
john
"Some flies are for fish most flies are for fisherman"
 
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