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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What do I need to do about my gear after fishing the salt?? I emailed Redington about my RS2 reel and I guess it was designed for the salt, much to my surprise?? Anyways all they really said was to keep it tight and rinse it afterwards everytime?? My question is what about my chestpack and rod?? Also do I need to unwind my line and rinse it or does rinsing it on the spool work good enough?? :dunno

Any other tips or tricks about the salt??

Thanks

~Patrick ><>
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the input :thumb

Would wd-40 be considered an oil?? I ask cause the Redington people said the following in their email response:

"Made for salt water. Don't oil the drag, and keep it tight after use. Use grease on moving parts and just rinse after use."

Maybe its different between manufacturers??

~Patrick ><>
 

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For saltwater I've had the same SA reel and Sage rod now for 13 years with no corrosion or other problems. I do pretty much what Rockfish does for maintenance purposes except that I will soak my rod in the tub for about an hour or so 1x/week during peak season (August - October). I started doing this after I had problems breaking down my rod when salt crystallized on the ferrules. Probably isn't necessary but it hasn't hurt it yet either.
 

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Formerly Tight Loops
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I just rinse off my rod in the shower. All you need to do is get the salt off the guides and the reelseat.

With a sealed arbor reel, don't disassemble it. Just rinse off the external reel with water. Soaking it sounds like a good idea, as down in the backing my reels look pretty cruddy (but not so I would say they were in bad shape) if only rinsed off.

With non-sealed reels (like my Okumas) I recommend cleaing off the arbor and the bearing (which can easily rust) and then using a good quality of bicycle grease, greasing the spindle and bearing. If you use a decent quantity, it will keep the spindle and bearing rust free without constant disassembly.

Rob
 

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Patrick,
I rinse the rod off in the shower. As for the reels, Kaufmann's sells a product called Boe-Shield. Developed by Boeing, it is designed to stop corrosion. I put it on the reel the night before fishing the salt. It dries to kind of a white/clear finish. I really like the stuff and have had no corrosion problems.
Good Luck,
Brian
 

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Just an Old Man
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I used to know it all---but now that I'm older I seem to forget it all.

We used to spray that stuff on the belly to prevent corrision(in a/p's). It was a messy thing to play with. But I didn't know you could buy it on the open market. But what do I know,I've been retired from Boeing for four years now.

Jim
 

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watch the flies - make sure you don't put a fly back in the box with the clean ones - you'll open it again in a few months and they will all start showing corrosion.

I soak reels for a day - tupperware in the sink and just add water as you go by - dissolves all the salt.

Pay attention to places like guide feet, reel seats, recessed screw heads - any crannies that can harbor salt.

I second boe-sheild use - not as messy as wd40...have also used a nice gun/boat wax on the reels before hitting the salt.

Jim W
 

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Patrick,

I've recently heard on another saltwater board about Redington's recommendation to crank the drag tight for storage. Though this is contrary to every other manufacturer out there, it seems it is the correct procedure for the Redington product. The main reason for backing off the drag is to relieve any pressure on the drag material or drag washers to ensure smoothness. But, as someone else suggested, contact Redington for clarification.

Regarding the cleaning of fly lines after use in the salt: I remove my lines completely, wash them in a very mild soap solution to remove dirt and salt deposits, rinse thoroughly and then hang to air dry. You'll notice something very interesting among other saltwater fly fishers and that is they protect the fingers of their "rod holding" hand where line is stripped in against the pressure of their finger joints. Why? Because salt is very abrasive and stripping line can result in painful cuts after a day in the salt. Now, cleaning your line thoroughly after fishing in the salt won't do anything to relieve or eliminate those cuts, but it should restore your line to near-original condition so that you can cast with less friction on your next trip out. Some also suggest the abrasive "see-sawing" as salt encrusted line goes through the guides wears them down, but I have no personal knowledge of that.

As far as other equipment maintenance goes, I thoroughly rinse my waders and boots with fresh water and allow them to air dry. I don't use a chest pack, but I can tell you anything that has metal zippers or snaps should also be cleaned thoroughly - probably a good thing to keep in mind when shopping for gear that will be used in the salt is to look for plastic (or similar) zippers and snaps. Heck, I even rinse my lanyard and stainless steel tools (e.g. forceps.)

As far rod & reel care is concerned, it gets pretty confusing when one person tells you to use WD-40 and another tells you not to, doesn't it? Who to believe? What to use?

Not to be contrary to anyone, I offer the following thought: Penn has been manufacturing saltwater fishing reels since 1933. I'd say that qualifies them as being knowledgeable and experienced in the care and preventive maintenance of saltwater fishing gear. There is an outstanding Maintenance Tips article on their website at http://www.pennreels.com/maintenance.php. It is the method I use in caring for all my saltwater gear, all of which looks and performs as good as new (minus a few dings, of course.)

As a final note, several other manufacturers of high end reels also suggest using WD-40 for removing salt deposits, Abel for example. And the Corrosion-X and Bo-Shield products mentioned are both outstanding in their intended use...I use them on my outboards and ALL metal fittings and parts on my boat with no evidence of corrosive activity...absolutely outstanding results.

Good fishing to you and I hope something I've offered helps you develop your own program of preventive maintenance.

Greg
 

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Stop Killing Wild Steelhead!
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The reason I use fresh water is that it works and is non polluting, you can spray everything and really get the salt out.Typically I will flush everything out for a few minutes, maybe strp off my flyline too. You should not have to use soap on your flyline and that may strip out some of the surface treatments that flyline coatings now contain.Fresh water rinsing and a dry clean cloth,( I like diaper material!),should be all you need. Soaking a reel for any length of time may get water or soap or whatever into the bearings and displace the lubricant, and damage the bearing seals. I do not use WD40 because it is toxic and leaves a residue. The residue may damage many materials over time and it may also pollute the water.I don't like solid film protectants because they add a layer or lamination of material that you have to worry about, maintain and eventually strip off and reapply.Fresh water is really all you need to eliminate salt after fishing.One helpful lubricant that Tibor/Billy Pate Reels uses,(Ted Juracsik),is Super Lube, in a greasy paste form that comes in a tube. Very good for cork and other friction type drag plates.Not too thick and wont wash out under heat.Keep it simple.
 
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