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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm going to start practicing at Green Lake soon maybe Haller as well and wondered if anyone has some info on what might actually get a bite or two. I'm going to be using a float tube. I'd like to stick with 2 or 3 winter early spring patterns to get the techinique down. Thanks a lot.
 

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Formerly Tight Loops
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There are trout and tiger muskies in Green Lake. If I were you, I would just toss wooley buggers. carey specials, or drown chironomids.

And I understand when a guy in a float tube found a musky headed at his fly near him, he lost a load in his waders, and isn't going to float tube the lake any more, as he is too afraid of having his nads removed.

It may be an urban legend, but it sure is funny to think about.

If you want to try for the muskies, try some bigger feather wing streamers or poppers.

Rob
 

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:smokin Green Lake-My alma matter!

Three years ago when I graduated from college and ate Lake Washington perch, lake whitefish, and crappie to suppliment my income of $10.00 an hour in a law firm, I too fished Green Lake. It was right near Ballard where I was living and it was as good as any place to PRACTICE, especially the T-dock. If you fish green lake you have to understand what it is: It's the bastard of all lake fishing; the sacrificial lamb that keeps a memory for Seattlelites of what fishing is. The tax dollars to support the WDFW largely come from Seattle (because it has the largest population), which augment great fisheries all across the state. Therefore, Green lake is planted with rainbows 4x a year to provide "fast" action. Those bleeding hearts of the local area free their goldfish, aquarium fish and whatever else into the lake in an attempt to "free it" of an oppressive life in a goldfish bowl. In fact a few years ago someone freed a cayman into the lake and provided the lake's first carnivorous reptile. They got the alligator off the lake faster than you can say "Anbesol."

Considering the INTENSE pressure on the lake by baitfishermen, not many fish will live through the year to figure out what the hell a bug hatch is. Therefore, flies in flourescent colors are a good bet for a hatchery stocker. Fish can be taken on chronomid/indicator set-ups in the spring, but more fish will be taken on brightly colored streamers. If you really want to learn to be a good flyfisher, I would target the thousands of carp that inhabit this murky water lake. Carp are the most difficult fish to take on a fly in our state, but likely the most gratifying when you catch them, because they are so spooky.

I have hooked up with a Green Lake Tiger Muskie ONCE fishing along the SE corner of the lake fishing after dark. I had a double-jointed black bunny leach on and after a night of trolling around with full-sinking line and getting absolutely nothing, I was quickly stripped in all of my line as fast as possible so I could reel up my line and get the hell out of there. Just as the fly made it to the suface---"BaBoom!" A big splash in which I felt some tension, and the line went flat. My fly was gone. Moral of the story: Tiger Muskies have sharp teeth and you need to intentionally pursue them with wire tippets. The rainbow will not strike if you have a wire tippet and there's your trade-off. Also, now and again you can take a land-locked juvenile coho that some jokers at the UW Oceanograpy Dept put in there a few years back.

Keep practicin' good buddy!

Sparse

Streams are made for the wise man to contemplate and fools to pass by.
(Sir Izaak Walton)
 

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Green Lake? Now were gettin serious boys!!! Well, I guess I'll spill the beans about this fantastic zipper lip lake right here in Seattle. One guy I know caught a 27" rainbow during one of Green lakes legendary evening bites. I find the spring/summer time the best time of year to fish for 2 reasons: 1. the fish are ready and willing to bite at any fly. 2. the hot chick factor. Never undestimate the hotties rollerblading past while you slay huge trout as you suck on a stogie enjoying the scenery;) It just makes fishing that much better! lol YT }(
 

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Stop Killing Wild Steelhead!
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I have fished for Tiger Muskies back east. Listen to me very carefully: Do not put your hand or fingers or any other precious body part, extension or appendage, anywhere near the northbound end of a Tiger Muskie. You can get away with 30 lb test bite guards, about one foot long is plenty, at the end of your tippet- if you insist on this insanity. I would have a pair of cheap needle nose pliars handy.And some bandaids. The really bad thing about muskie fishing with flies is that you'll get addicted with relatively little success and you'll be out there more than you planned.It's fun.
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Well this thread has been way too funny. As I have never thrown a fly before it "green" is close and easy to practice. As for the Muskie I guess I will purchase a new Stainles Steel Cup for the occassion. Thanks for the suggestions and I will take a quick photo of my first fish whatever it may be when I land it:)
 

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I've fished for Muskies and Northerns too. Tiger Musky is a hybrid of the two. Little Stone is correct- be VERY wary of their mouth. They will rip your hand up. There's the occasional documented case of Musky biting swimmers in the north woods, but I wouldn't worry too much about it. :) They love to chomp smaller (but not small) fish-- a large streamer would probably works well. And you can't strip too fast for them-- I have heard of guides who troll at 25mph+ for them in Minnesota.
 
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