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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am not looking for anyones secret fishin hole here, But wouldn't mind them. Anyway I was wondering if anyone could lead me towards a less travelled remote lake where fish can be found and fisher folks are few. I don't mind puttin some miles under my feet, actually would prefer it. Planning a trip for the end of March. Thank you in advance. I know some things are kept under lock and key. I am just hoping to be pointed in a general direction and anything beyond that I am deeply indebted.:dunno :7
 

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Whammo!
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A few great websites that I have found that have some good information on Alpine lakes and the fish that reside in them are: www.washingtonlakes.com, but a new addition is www.alpinejo.com I like the second one for it gives a little more detail on what kind of fishing you can possibly get into even though it appears he is using hard tackle. Good luck and I hope this helps!

Mike:beer1
 

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Slainte
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Littlewing72, interesting if it has any implication to Jimi because he was gone by '72.
One of the best tools for finding "remote" lakes is the Gazetteer put out by DeLorme.
Where do you live? I know of a few places I'd share with you.

Roper,Truth above all else
 

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You're off to a good start by heading east. The weather's better, the fishing's better, there's less people.

My only word of advice is to replan your trip about 3-4 months later. Even in a low snowyear, you'll be hard pressed to find many highlakes where you won't be augering a hole to get at the fish. And, for the record, over here, we're not really having a low snow year (as on the westside of the crest) so plan accordingly.

You may consider getting ahold of any of those '101 hikes' series books for the region you're most interested in. Combine that with the Delorme Gazateer and hit the trail. Nearly all of our highlakes have some sort of salmonid swimming their waters thanks to hard working folks from groups like the Highlakers.

Jack
 

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This year is going to be a low snowpack year and probably most lakes will thaw a month early. They are talking about opening Hwy 20 in early to mid April which will be a record for that highway.

AlpineJo has a wonderful website I must say. It reminds me of many of the adventure hike I have been on just to catch some nice fish.

My advise on hiking the lakes, March is too early for the Alpine Lakes. Start in June and bring plenty of Deet.

Surprisingly, there are a ton of lakes with trout that average 12" or greater. We can thank the Washington Trail Blazers for that. They have been the greatest thing that ever happened to this state. It has allowed some lakes to grow fish in the 20" to 24" range.

Of course, the more remote the lake the better your chances of catching a big fish with no effort. These days, I find myself driven towards this type of fishing over typical crowded river fishing.

If you would like a few starter lakes, check out some of the lakes off of the Middle Fork. They hardly ever get fished because there are a ton of lazy folks in this state who would rather walk 100 yards to fish rather that 10 miles. This reserves the lakes for the fit and healthy, luckily.

Good luck!
 

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I have not fished it for a few years but Dusty Lake in the Quincy Wildlife Area was a good place....everytime I have gone never more than 4-5 others fishing. It is a steep 30 minute hike into the lake. There are other lakes around too. Fishing has always been good 14-18" Bows..never caught a brown but have heard of people pulling out 5-6 lb'ers. Check out www.washingtonlakes.com for info on other lakes including alpine lakes. :beer1 :beer1
 

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I'll share because as noted above most people won't go if its more than a walk from a parking lot. Especially if you have to pack a tube.

With that said, I hope I'm not giving away anyone's heven.

It is not an east of the rang lake but try Martin on the middle fork of the Snoq. It is a scramble. There is no marked trail. But, it has some nice fish. Be aware, that there is little bank access so pack a tube.

You could also hike into Waptus out of Salmon La Sac. It is a larg lake with a reasonable population of fish but you will not be alone even with the 10- 12 -16 mile round trip hike. From Waptus as a base camp you can hit a number of other lakes.

If you want east side lowland lakes, there are a couple of hike in ones in the Quincy lakes area. They are all seep/pothole lakes and a couple of them have some nice fish. I think "Q" (????) was good. But it has been YEARS since I fished any of these.

Also, Bank (possibley Burk) has a nice population of brook trout. It's north of 90 south of 2. I could not tell you how to find it because the logging roads are not numbered as far as I can tell. It is a 1.5 to 2 mile scramble each way mostly through a steep, tick infested clearcut. The fish are somewhat small on average (7-9) but at one time the lake/pond was stocked with Goldens and you can still see some of the genetic markers in the fish.

North of 2 there you could try Whale lake, although its on the west side of the Mnts. In my opinion it is a three day hike in trip.

Granit and lower Granit (north and east of Darrington(sp?)) have Grayling, which are a blast to see rise.

That's all I'm giving. Nothing here for the weak legged. All at least 3+ miles with a pack because you will wish you had a tube if you don't. All the short (3-5 mile) hikes are no trial scrambles. Bring a Map and be ready for the weather. If you go tead lightly and pack it back out. There is nothing worse than humping in 5 miles and seeing beer cans on the bottom.

Again, I hope I did not offend by giving information that I think is generally available. We each have our closely held places, but it never hurts to give up a few nice ones where, at least I believe, only a very few would venture.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I guess I needed to clarify. I was planning on going a little further east. I always bring my gear when hiking toward alpine lakes and have found most quite productive. I was thinking more of the high desert lakes. I have never fished any of these but have always heard great things. Was hoping to find some remote ones. You know take the road less travelled by. Anyway thank you to all the input, I will definately try some of these recommendations.:7 When the snow pack permits.
 

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The Quincy Wildlife/lakes area is high desert. All Sage Brush and rocks. Dusty as noted by another is/was Ok early. There are others and some quite a bit more than a 1/2 mile hike. All are fairly small. There are also a number of seep lakes in the Potholes area. If you thinking of the Okanogan then I can't help for hike in other than the lake that sits about 1/2 mile from Chopaka. :dunno
 

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Here's one for you. It's called Copper Glance Lake. It's north of Winthrop off eight mile creek road. It's a three mile hike in that is pretty much all uphill. 1/4 the way there you'll cross a stream. 1/2 way there you'll meet the old Copper Glance mine (very refreshing on a hot summer day). 3/4 of the way there you'll cross another stream. Don't be fooled by the pond you come to at the top. You have to work your way around the pond and up and over a final cliff to get to the lake. The lake is tucked into a basin at the bottom of some cliffs.

Fishing from shore is possible around most of the lake but roll casts will make it easier as the slope behind you will limit distance. The trail is wide up to the mine. From the mine to the pond it is smaller but clearly marked. From the pond to the lake is not as clearly marked but once you find it, it is easy to follow. There is one camping area on the west side of the lake and will accomodate 2 people pretty well. Fishing is best on this side of the lake as well.

You'll find a nice population of brook trout. The water is extremely cold and I can't imagine growth is very fast so catch and release is appreciated.

Pete
 

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You might want to wait for the snow to melt, then for the mosquitos to disappear. March is a little early for the high country--unless you are high?

I already gave you my two cents about freezingmy ass off at Black Lake.

Mcronariver
 
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