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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just read this article in the Seattle Times about the Hoh Tribe wanting to get some more land, away from the Hoh River, which is erroding their area. I see this as a fantastic opporunity possible for WA State and maybe, the Hoh Trust to do a land swap and negotiate reduced kill limits on the Hoh River system. I don't think we should just give them some land, free of charge.
What do you think ?? Maybe now is a good time to write our congressional reps about this??
JD

http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/localnews/2011292772_hohtribe09m.html

Besieged by water, Hoh Tribe seeks 37 acres of Olympic National Park
By Lynda V. Mapes

Seattle Times staff reporter

HOH RESERVATION,

It chews, it gnaws and jumps around, avulsing in a tantrum of energy to new channels, taking anything in its way right along with it. Just ask members of the Hoh Tribe: The river that carries their name is shoving them right out of their reservation.

The Hoh are a tiny tribe of fewer than 300 members, with an even smaller reservation " only a mile square when it was created in 1893. And the reservation is besieged by water from three directions: Storm surges barrel in from the Pacific. The river floods nearly every winter. And then there's the torrential rain: The Hoh live in one of the rainiest places in the lower forty-eight.

The tribe's community center and many members' homes on the reservation are encircled by sandbags to hold back the water that is too often at their doors. Some homes have even been abandoned.

As chunks of their reservation wash away, the Hoh have turned to Congress for help, seeking legislation to deed a chunk of Olympic National Park to the tribe to move the remote, isolated reservation to higher ground.

Most usable land on the reservation is within the 100-year flood plain of the river, making economic development even harder for this tribe battered by high unemployment and poverty.

The tribe has worked for several years to acquire a safe homeland for its people and a viable land base for economic development. The tribe has purchased about 260 acres to move some of its reservation out of the flood zone, and has taken title to 160 acres transferred to the tribe from the state Department of Natural Resources.

The tribe now is seeking 37 acres of national-park land, to be deeded into trust as part of its reservation, through an act of Congress.

While only a small piece of land, it is crucial to the Hoh because it would connect the tribe's existing parcels into a contiguous swath of usable land. The tribe has plans for a new future on that land, from building housing for its people, to creating a publicly accessible trail from Highway 101 to the beach.

The bill that would transfer the parkland to the tribe would prohibit logging or hunting on the parcel, today in second-growth forest and an important wildlife corridor. The tribe also would be prohibited from developing a casino on the property.

Written in collaboration between the tribe and the National Park Service, the bill is sponsored in the House by Rep. Norm Dicks, D-Bremerton, and co-sponsored in the Senate by Democratic Sens. Patty Murray and Maria Cantwell. The measure was introduced more than a year ago, but the tribe still is waiting for approval of the legislation in the other Washington â€" and nervously waiting out another winter flood season.

The Hoh River moves a lot of water: more than 50 times the flow of the Green River in King County. To many tribal members, the Hoh is not the river they knew growing up. It floods more often and more violently, partly a result of various government agencies hardening river banks off the reservation for erosion control, and timber companies cutting the uplands, tribal members say.

"It's not the river," said Mary Leitka, a tribal elder. "It's because of the things we human beings have done that have changed it."

Born in La Push, Clallam County, Leitka came to the Hoh in the 1950s, when there was no road to the reservation, no running water and no electricity. Tribal members depended on the river for everything from the water they drank to the fish they ate, even transportation: Leitka used to take a canoe to get to school.

"It was our life," she said of the Hoh. It still is.

Ernie Penn, the tribe's fish and wildlife officer and a member of the tribal council, recently blazed upriver in an open boat throwing a roostertail of spray. Tribal Chairwoman Maria Lopez pointed out the places where the river has taken out homes and jumped its channel.

Penn slowed the boat, easing it to a beach where the river meets the sea. As dusk fell and fog slinked in from the Pacific, he loaded the boat on a trailer in front of a home abandoned because of repeated flooding â€" another monument to the power of the river.

As he secured the boat, Lopez said she hopes for a more stable future for her tribe. Based not on straitjacketing a river that won't be tamed, but on getting out of its way.

"I'm ready to watch the community grow," Lopez said. "We've been in the flood zone for so long."

Lynda V. Mapes: 206-464-2736 or [email protected]

Copyright © The Seattle Times Company
 

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Hoh opporunity??

Man......

you don't think we should give them land?? really?

not like it was tragically stolen anyway. not like they have been raped.

if there was one wild steelhead left, and the tribe wanted to harvest it, I would support the decision. I don't think it would be a responsible choice, but I would still support it. I will be contacting my rep in full support of giving the tribe land, thanks for the heads up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hoh opporunity??

i am not saying not to help them. back in the day, when the original treaties were negotiated and the tribes received their fishing rights, it was also when their land rights were negotiated with the U.S. this is why they must go to congress to get the extra 38 acres. On a side note, the Hoh Trust could also probably simply give them a comparable spot in a trade, sure would be alot easier option for the tribe, i bet they'd trade a few fish for that, just like old times. thus, i think it is fair to have the conversation that as we help them improve their situation, that they can also improve things on their end, thus, both sides take a step forward, in the direction of a better tomorrow of everyone. the tribe, the U.S. and more importantly, the fish on the Hoh River. The beauty of this opportunity is that it really doesn't cost the US much, nor the tribe, it's not like either party would be writing a big check, but then again, their truly is never such a thing as "free" anymore is there?! it always costs you something, but the opportunity cost on this is minimal considering the benefit both parties would get.
 

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Hoh opporunity??

Yes, it would be ideal if everything could be improved in one go. But, if it comes down to the whats better for the remaining tribal members vs the remaining fish i go with the tribe every time.

its sad that the situation is where it is.
 

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Just an Old Man
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Hoh opporunity??

I had a buddy that had some property on the Suiattle river. The river washed his land away. The state didn't give him any new land.

Let them live on the land in the river.
 

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Josh
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Hoh opporunity??

I think that the Hoh tribe has a minimal netting schedule, sure would like to see that gone, but I believe that there are other tribes out there that are heavy offenders, namely the Quillayute Tribe.
 

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Hoh opporunity??

Its not free.. its stolen property to start with. its pathetic that they are only gonna get 37 acres.

and old man, they didnt choose that land. its not like a kid born in 1980 decided that he liked that location and bought it to live on, then had it flooded out. ridiculous.
 

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Long Lost Member
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Hoh opporunity??

Dustin, I'm not trying to go down any controversial road, but didn't the Puget Sound and Coastal Tribes sign into a treaty that their ancestors recorded as wealth beyond their imagination? I'm sure there could be a huge philosophical differences in opinion on such a matter that you are obviously passionate about, none of us were at that negotiation table. No one from that table is still alive today to report about it. Generations have come and gone and continued to morph those treaties to suit their side, be it native peoples or federal governments. Probably not a matter best discussed here and now. I'm not looking to see anyone screwed over and I'm also not looking to see that fabled last steelhead harvested in a tribal net that you have referred to supporting. The answer is not in the extremes, it is somewhere in between those two polarized sides. Until they can come to an agreement the fish will continue to perish.
 

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Fly Guy Eat Pie
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Hoh opporunity??

Trade the land for a reduced netting schedule and no proposed Hoh River hatchery!!!

I already wrote all the sponsors and Co-Sponsors an email regarding this. I asked them where my free 37 acres was?
would also be nice to prohibit commercial sales of Hoh river steelhead...
 

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Doesn't care how you fish Moderator
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Hoh opporunity??

"The tribe has worked for several years to acquire a safe homeland for its people and a viable land base for economic development. The tribe has purchased about 260 acres to move some of its reservation out of the flood zone, and has taken title to 160 acres transferred to the tribe from the state Department of Natural Resources."

And now they want more???
 

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Team Umiak
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Hoh opporunity??

Hold on, have anyone of you been to the tribal enhabited property? It's tiny comparaed to La Push or Neah Bay. The Hoh is a dynamic river, and that's the way it should be..not confined or channelized like many of the rivers. A few acres to preserve the culture of the Hoh's is my tax money well spent..IMHO.
 

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Team Umiak
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Hoh opporunity??

I thought it was pretty clear and self explanatory. So let me turn it around on you..what Hoh tribe cultural aspects aren't you excited to support exactly?
 

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Hoh opporunity??

Nothing I can say is gonna change anyone's opinion on the subject, I had a long post typed out but fuck it. We all get to have our own opinions.

I have friends who are native, I have seen alot of different rez's first hand and the subject gets me goin good. So instead of put it all out there and start shit im just gonna do my thing, support my friends, and do my personal best to respect the culture, which is something that has largely not happened in America.

Native Pride. The youth are still strong despite what many of them have had to overcome. Here is a great song, for entertainment and this will be my last post in this thread. If I can't say anything nice I better just not say anything right? Don't even bother to post about how hip hop sucks please, ur wasting the skin on your fingertips!

VIEWER DISCRETION IS ADVISED

 

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Hoh opporunity??

Hold on, have anyone of you been to the tribal enhabited property? It's tiny comparaed to La Push or Neah Bay. The Hoh is a dynamic river, and that's the way it should be..not confined or channelized like many of the rivers. A few acres to preserve the culture of the Hoh's is my tax money well spent..IMHO.
before you all start crying for thelost indian culture. realize this the Hohs were originally quillayutes. Their culture is not in jeopardy. If they want to preserve their culture so bad than they can give up their jet boats and drift gill nets and move back into quanset huts or what ever they lived in. I agree with old man Jim. If my house was flooded out the us government would tell me tough shit I guess you are going to have to move. Oh btw
we are fining you for the polution you septic system leached into the river.
 

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"Chasing Riseforms"
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Hoh opporunity??

It is National Park Land that the bill is about. That's PUBLIC land. Of course you can negotiate a deed transfer. What is so wrong with that? People sell their land with conditions on it all the time. The bill they proposed already has some conditions attached to it, like no Casinos. So........ add some more conditions relative to fishing restrictions. It's ok with me.
 
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