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Jeffer. Ive seen these sorts of low priced pontoons before. My take on them is they are a step up from a float tube with not that much more cost. They are MUCH more comfortable than a tube.

It all comes down to where do you expect to use it. If the answer is still water, I'd say good choice. If the answer is Class III or higher rivers, I'd say very bad choice.

There's a reason quality rafts cost much more. The pontoon materials can take a beating.
 

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Cheap enough, but one annoying design flaw is that the foot pegs are so close together. Not much of an issue to step over in shallower water with a stable bottom but more of a pain in other situations.
 

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If it's the Costco boat, I know a couple of guys who bought them in the past and have used them with no problems on stillwaters. Heck of a price if you plan to use it exclusively on lakes and the like.
 

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y take on them is they are a step up from a float tube with not that much more cost. They are MUCH more comfortable than a tube.
I beg to differ - a float tube will always be my preferred fishing platform (for the fishing I now do). I can hold position without messing with an anchor, carry them reasonable "old man" distances, they are quiet & stealthy, and my back feels great when I use one. I use my 'toons where launches are close to my vehicle, I'm fishing in cold water, or covering areas larger than those I'd care to fin across. I use a pram at a few specific locations and if I plan to cover a lot of water, I take my Nucanoe. But, as stated, if I could only have one craft it would be a float tube.

All of that being said, I'll respond to the Op with: My preference in pontoon craft is in something with a reasonably stout frame (I DON'T float rivers), no less than 9' in length, less of a "rocker" profile for still water applications, and a more durable exterior bladder cover (or the same in a bladderless design). While my float tubes have heavy fabric skins, I am very careful where I set them down - tackweed causes leaks; float tubes go from my vehicle to the water & back without touching the ground with few exceptions. That is nearly impossible to emulate with a pontoon. A friend has a pontoon similar to the one pictured (same company, older boat) and he upgraded. Good luck.
 

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With pontoon boats, like many other products, you get what you pay for. There are tons of these boats on CL. Probably a reason for that....

If it is for stillwater only, and you want to check out what 'toons are like, not used heavily, probably an okay buy. When you decide to upgrade always nice to have a backup or one for a friend. Just do not expect it to last a very long time - frame will rust, sun will damage the 'toon, and bladders will need to be replaced eventually since they crack in the cold and are not elastic like urethane.

IMHO, it would be better to find a good used 'toon for a little bit more - maybe only a c-note more. Thicker pontoon material, urethane bladder, and stainless/heavy-duty frame make a huge difference in longevity, flexibility and functionality.
 

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Buddy has an older one of these (Costco purchase). Its mine now. Price was about the same. 9ft with slightly skinny toons but a fine ride. I've done many of basic river floats in it, does fine but I wasn't doing anything big with it. However, my buddy did the entire float from Trout Creek to locked gate in it. Did fine in White Horse Rapids believe it or not. They are pretty agile so you could skitter across the current and just avoid stuff you don't want to it. He got water up to his waist a time or two on a couple of drops but did well. I wouldn't do that kind of stuff in it though :).
 

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If saving $ is the idea I'd go with a used higher quality pontoon, then you don't have to worry about it. I've heard some not so great things about these, but they probably will work for awhile, just my opinion.
 

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I have the same Bucks Bags South Fork model I've had for almost 17 years now. Light, nimble, yet tough as nails. I've dragged it through woods, run it into a steep bank, banged it on rocks (you can't miss 'em all), and even used it in the salt, and the frame and pontoons are still SOLID. I've floated water up to class III in it with ease. I paid $600 in 2000... they've gone up quite a bit since. Only thing I wish was different might be another foot of length, but it's easily the best investment I've ever made in fishing. I'd roll with one of those or an Outcast boat if you want to go one-man pontoon. There are better boats made these days, but they're almost as expensive as a drift boat or raft, and at that point, I'm buying the drift boat or raft, know what I'm saying?

But yeah, for just lakes and slow rivers, that boat will work fine.
 

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I had one of them and ran coastal streams and rivers for two years without a problem. The reason I CL'd it was the wind blows it like dandelion fuzz. On a lake, casting downwind, the fly would be upwind of me before I could start to strip line, and I never did figure out how to both paddle and fish with only two hands.
 
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