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My 2 year old GWP is a great dog. She's eager, listens well, and is overall an awesome dog.

She hunts and points but I have been too busy to get out and really hunt her - so she's still not steady to flush.

She'll retrieve and I can get her to retrieve dead birds (even though she still gets really excited).

I've been thinking about leaving her with someone for a couple of weeks to work her for me.

The problem is that the folks I talk to generally, throw the dogs in the kennel and bring them out once or twice a day to work them. My hound is a pet and she really likes being part of the family. I have no problem leaving her alone but I'm a bit concerned about sticking her in a kennel for a month - most guys will only do a month not a couple weeks.

I left her in a kennel for a few weeks in a similar situation a year ago and it took me a couple of weeks to work the bad habits out of her (snapping at other dogs, cowering all the time, etc). In the field she's a machine but at home she's sensitive and wants to please and likes to be with her pack (I have 2 young kids).

Any suggestions on who I might be able to drop her off with for a couple of weeks for some tune up?
 

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now THIS is the way to get your dog to perform! so many hunters treat their hunting partners as a tool, and nothing more. Love your puppies, they're part of your family, not your shellbag
Amen! Hank has the run of the house and is a perfect gentleman about it. He knows he can get on the bed & leather furniture only on those areas where a dog blanket is present (and there are several.). I doubt that I'd fall asleep as quickly at night if he weren't curled-up by my side. We are both early morning risers & this has been a ritual on cool-house mornings for all five of his years (sans blanket when it's warm). Beyond that, whenever feasible he goes where I go.

To answer the Op's question - Hank spent a couple 2-week stints at Dunfur Kennel (Cheney) for intro to live birds & gunfire when he was a pup. Price was reasonable (but not a factor), Hank was well taken-care of, and I have no complaints. I was trained, also.
 

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My 2 year old GWP is a great dog. She's eager, listens well, and is overall an awesome dog.

She hunts and points but I have been too busy to get out and really hunt her - so she's still not steady to flush.

She'll retrieve and I can get her to retrieve dead birds (even though she still gets really excited).

I've been thinking about leaving her with someone for a couple of weeks to work her for me.

The problem is that the folks I talk to generally, throw the dogs in the kennel and bring them out once or twice a day to work them. My hound is a pet and she really likes being part of the family. I have no problem leaving her alone but I'm a bit concerned about sticking her in a kennel for a month - most guys will only do a month not a couple weeks.

I left her in a kennel for a few weeks in a similar situation a year ago and it took me a couple of weeks to work the bad habits out of her (snapping at other dogs, cowering all the time, etc). In the field she's a machine but at home she's sensitive and wants to please and likes to be with her pack (I have 2 young kids).

Any suggestions on who I might be able to drop her off with for a couple of weeks for some tune up?
You
 

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I think you can do the finishing work on your own. I would take dog to a reputable trainer and work together with him/her to finish your dog if need a little guidance. I be learned over the past 40 plus years working with dogs that owners require training just as much as the dogs. I've picked up quite a bit just working with my dogs. It's a rewarding experience

I have hunted with a number of individuals who have had their dogs professionally trained and was not too impressed. I noticed that the dog did not listen to them unless they shocked the heck out of them or constantly blew the whistle which is annoying and alerts the birds. My perception watching their dogs hunt was there was no bond or connection to the owner. Their dogs were hunting for themselves not in partnership with their owners.

. I recently hunted along a professional trainer and 3 guys who had their dogs with him all summer. I chose to hunt with this trainer for tips to finish my 2 year old dog, Well, their dogs were running ahead 200 yds or more busting birds left and right. It was a paid hunt on private land and I was getting frustrated and asked the trainer what was the deal with professionally trained dogs. He responded that he trained the dogs but it was evident the owners never spent time with their dogs when he returned them and all the trainig he did was fruitless. These guys paid thousands of dollars too.


I hunted alone with the trainer and asked for feedback on my dog as I trained her myself as I have done on all my other dogs. He noticed that during hunting that my dog would look back and check with me when working cover. He remarked that in 30 years of training and competition one of the better dogs he has hunted behind and offered to buy her jokingly. I told be honest and no BS and repeated the same. Not bragging but I think many dog owners fail to develop a bond with their hunting dog and this makes a big difference imho

I'm not anal when I train my dog and make sessions short and fun and socializing is important for the dog too exposing to different environments and other animals. On a side note last year hunted with 2 guys from Kansas with their dogs that supposedly won national titles. They were talking their dogs up who they never allowed in their house and they always stayed outside in kennels. Anyway we're hunting birds in SD in a field with cows on it. They let their four dogs out of kennel in back of their truck. The dogs saw the cows nearby and freaked out and took off. The rest of the day was spent trying to locate the professionally trained national title dogs. I limited out with my dog in 2 hours.

Just my experience is work on basic commands a bit every day
Work on whoa or stay command and there are many ways to do this

Make retrieving fun. My dog works better with food rewards vs praise at the beginning. Try and do at least a few minutes of training a day year round if you can. Some dogs require a heavier hand than others but pay attention to what works with dog. Prey drive is very important and get that starting at six months. I raised pigeons and used them. It took a few months with my dog and was getting frustrated then one day it clicked with her now she is a machine.

I like an e collar in the course of my training but use it sparingly

When I go hiking and fishing with her e collar is always on her. The leave it command is important when she sees deer other animals like skunks and porcupines snakes. I really watch her around roads as too many good dogs are accidentally killed on roads every year

Richard at Blue moon kennels inesr Olympia is a great trainer and works one on one.

Just my two cents
 

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I use a collar & Hank wears one when hunting - used PROPERLY, a collar is a great tool. I like it primarily because I can stop my dog at a distance, in high wind/noisy conditions, etc. to keep him safe if he's heading for trouble. And I primarily use the tone function; the stimulation level, when rarely used, is set on the lowest setting that he can detect (I have also tried ALL levels on myself so I know.). People who misuse an e-collar should be forced to wear one. When I pick-up Hank's collar he runs to me & sits so I can put it on - the collar has always been associated with good experiences.

While time with a trainer can be rewarding, the most important trainer is you (as stated above.). Only constant interaction, refresher practice, and time spent together will serve to create the all-important bond which results in your pup's desire to please.
 

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I doubt that I'd fall asleep as quickly at night if he weren't curled-up by my side. We are both early morning risers & this has been a ritual on cool-house mornings for all five of his years (sans blanket when it's warm). Beyond that, whenever feasible he goes where I go.
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Nothing's changed in all these years Jim...it's a boy and his dog!
 

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learned over the past 40 plus years working with dogs that owners require training just as much as the dogs. I've picked up quite a bit just working with my dogs. It's a rewarding experience

I have hunted with a number of individuals who have had their dogs professionally trained and was not too impressed. I noticed that the dog did not listen to them unless they shocked the heck out of them or constantly blew the whistle which is annoying and alerts the birds. My perception watching their dogs hunt was there was no bond or connection to the owner. Their dogs were hunting for themselves not in partnership with their owners.
Great observations and input ribka.. I missed the additional replies on this thread earlier.

Was somewhat surprised (but find it interesting) you hunted your dog on fur (the rabbit thread) have never seen that advocated anywhere but am not that in the know either. The male Brittany we had in my youth would definitely point and hold for rabbits. Out of the blue a few years ago I got a note from an old friend who's life ambition was to become a professional dog trainer.. which he and his wife have accomplished: http://www.hifivekennels.com/ The note was an apology for shooting a rabbit my dog pointed ..after I'd specifically asked him and another friend prior to hunting not to do! I guess he had a sudden guilt trip a couple decades after the fact (smiling)
 
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